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ABOUT UAT
University of Advancing Technology is an elite, private college that serves its student body by fostering knowledge creation and academic excellence in an environment that embraces the young technophiles of the world. With three centers of research and a suite of technology-centered undergraduate and graduate degrees, the University is a recognized leader in technology education.

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    Arizona's Fight Against the Tech Talent Shortage


    Right now, there are 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in Arizona alone. Nationally, we need an additional 400,000 security analysts, network engineers, vulnerability researchers, pen testers and other professionals to fight cybercrime and protect data. The Obama Administration estimated that the US would have 1.4 million computer science jobs by 2020—but only 400,000 computer science...

    Right now, there are 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in Arizona alone. Nationally, we need an additional 400,000 security analysts, network engineers, vulnerability researchers, pen testers and other professionals to fight cybercrime and protect data. The Obama Administration estimated that the US would have 1.4 million computer science jobs by 2020—but only 400,000 computer science graduates to fill them.

     Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 9.21.46 AM

     “The AZ tech community, like the tech community at large, is facing a huge talent shortage gap,” Carine Dieude, an entrepreneur and Arizona tech community advocate. “It’s not an easy career. It is crucial to provide support to a wider demographic interested in tech,” she added. That’s exactly what she is doing at Girls in Tech Phoenix.

     

    Girls in Tech PHX partnered with a local Microsoft store to offer free YouthSpark Workshops for girls and boys ages 10–12. Students who attend these hands-on workshops learn about robotics, coding, public speaking, mixed reality and videography.

     

    Middle schoolers and high schoolers who are ready to dive deeper into robotics, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things can check out Robot Factory. Robot Factory is an after-school program for students who want to break into the black box, build circuit boards, tinker with Raspberry Pi and learn real-world embedded systems programming skills with AZ Hyperloop Team Co-Founder Lynne Nethken!

     

    {% video_player "embed_player" overrideable=False, type='scriptV4', hide_playlist=True, viral_sharing=False, embed_button=False, width='640', height='360', player_id='7459819297', style='' %}

    Robot Factory

     

    Lynne works as a robotics engineer at 10 Imaging, a technology company that brings awareness to everyday devices. The 10 Imaging team recently moved into UAT’s on-campus coworking space Perimeter83. UAT Robotics & Embedded Systems students have the opportunity to help Lynne with Robot Factory's STEM classes.

     

    UAT also helps hundreds of Girl Scouts earn coding badges every summer. (And UAT faculty and staff buy all the cookies in the spring. UAT Bursar Renne Grauberger has the goods.) But how do we get more college students and working adults interested in computer science, keep them engaged and then get them ready for careers?

     

    {% video_player "embed_player" overrideable=False, type='scriptV4', hide_playlist=True, viral_sharing=False, embed_button=False, width='1280', height='624', player_id='7459835363', style='' %}

     

    Perimeter83 helps to close the gap between students and industry by bringing industry to campus. Insight Vice President of Global Business Transformation and IoT SME Curt Cornum just signed up for a designated desk space in the P83 Study. He brings an infectious energy to campus. 

     

    UAT professors proactively partner with industry on real-world projects, which students can often earn credit for as a special topics course. For example, Dr. Jill Coddington’s computer science and artificial intelligence students are collaborating on an AI transcription project with a neurosurgery organization. “There are fun challenges as some of the medical terminology is not standard mainstream English words used every day,” Dr. Coddington said.

     

    Carine and the rest of the fabulous Girls in Tech PHX team do a lot to engage and support the next generation of devs while they are in school and after they graduate. “Mentorship is not an everyday activity…it is a support system we can call on when we need help, advice or a new skill set,” Carine said. Girls in Tech PHX makes it easy for young developers and computer science students to connect with professionals who are already killing it in their fields online and in person.

     

    University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman has also been thinking about adults who want to get into tech (or would be a good fit and don’t even know it) but already have degrees in business, communications, history, biology or psychology. “If you have a degree, you likely already know how to think, problem solve and bring ideas together in ways that make sense to people. You simply need the technical skills involved with securing information and writing software,” Dave said.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-02-06 at 3.39.00 PM

     

    UAT’s innovative graduate and certificate programs address the lack of education options available to individuals who have degrees but want to retool their knowledge. Students can complete tech-intensive, 8-week modules such as Cloud Computing, Big Data, Algorithms and Patterns, Social Engineering, Information Assurance or Change Management as stand-alone units or combine multiple modules to earn a master’s degree.

     

    Want to fight the tech talent gap and future-proof your career? Apply today!

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    Arizona Has a Thriving Tech Community


    Earlier this week the Arizona House of Representatives invited University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman to the Capitol to present on technology trends and workforce needs in Arizona.   ...

    Earlier this week the Arizona House of Representatives invited University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman to the Capitol to present on technology trends and workforce needs in Arizona.

     

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    “It was easy,” Dave said, because “Arizona is a great place to be an innovator.”

     

    The combination of a pro-business government with an earnest interest in disruptive idea experimentation, a budding tech talent pool and beautiful weather makes Arizona an ideal location to launch a tech startup or work for one AND live a life full of hiking on mountains and brunching on patios.

     

    The Arizona FinTech Sandbox encapsulates Arizona’s commitment to innovation. The Sandbox enables business and entrepreneurs to test out innovative financial products or services by providing access to a limited Arizona market without forcing innovators to spend time and money obtaining state licensures or changing laws.

     

    “Fintech is already a disruptive $30-billion industry, and it’s only going to continue to shake things up,” Dr. Bolman said. “But Europe and countries like the UK and Estonia are leading the way,” he noted. How can the U.S. keep up?

     

    Disruption by innovative Arizona companies goes beyond fintech and includes other traditional industries such as real estate, the car buying industry and even mattresses.

     

    “Arizona is bursting with innovative tech companies, from small startups like Myndshft, to established organizations like Axosoft (#itwasneveradress), to giant companies like McKesson.” Said Carine Dieude, Girls in Tech Phoenix mentorship chair and awesome human being.

     

    AZ Blockchain Initiative Co-Founder Melissa Portocarrero Armas agrees that Arizona is a great place for businesses. “Tech companies in Arizona are doing what they’re supposed to do: They’re growing, but they’re also engaging,” which makes Arizona a great place for people and community too. “There are a lot of incubators, community organizations and nonprofits that focus their attention and resources in developing our local talent,” Melissa said.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 11.41.58 AM

     

    Girls in Tech Phoenix is one of those organizations. Last year, they launched LEAD, a female-first mentoring and social platform powered by artificial intelligence. This year, they’re hosting monthly mentoring meetups #CrushItWednesdays. “It is hard to advance one’s career in tech, but we want to shift that conversation and talk about how we can make it easier, promote positive change and actively get involved,” Carine said. The Cybersecurity Council of Arizona has a similar initiative, Cybersecurity Career Conversations, for Arizona’s infosec community.

     

    Even the big the companies are catching on to the mentorship trend.

     

    Screen Shot 2018-08-14 at 11.37.21 AM

     

    McKesson developers and designers collaborate with software engineering students at the 2018 McKHackathon at UAT.

     

    Last summer, Carine collaborated closely with McKesson leadership to host a hackathon at UAT, which brought together developers, scientists and designers from McKesson with students and community members. “The McKHackathon is a testimony to McKesson’s leadership in technological innovation and commitment to pushing their developers and scientists to think outside of the box and remain open to the next big ideas that could improve lives around the world,” Carine said.

     

    Generosity is a common—and practiced—theme here in Phoenix, which has a rising reputation as the (affordable) “Silicon Desert.” Just try reaching out to anyone who uses the hashtag #yesphx. But many groups are working to expand the tech love beyond the sprawling metropolis of 1.6 million people.

     

    For example, this year PHX Startup Week is hosting events all around the Valley from Mesa to Phoenix to Gilbert. Glendale—the Silicon Mountains?—is home to 1,000 technology companies that employ 41,000 people. And the Tucson tech community continues to thrive with support from the Arizona Technology Council.

    Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 11.37.18 AM

    Melissa and her partners at the AZ Blockchain Initiative recently launched Project Phoenix, a collaborative partnership, building a mesh network to bring internet to South Phoenix and rural Arizonans. “Big things are coming to Arizona, and we’re paving the way for a more diverse and inclusive tech industry," she said.

     

    Do you want to earn a high-powered technology degree and contribute to the awesome Arizona tech community? Apply to UAT today!

     

    P.S. You can text "Girls in Tech" to 27000 to get updates about their events and resources.

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    Top 3 Tech Themes from CES 2019


    I’m still geeking out about the cool new tech I encountered during my annual safari to the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Like all CES events, CES 2019 showcased new tech toys pipelined for 2019 and alpha versions of what companies think will...

    I’m still geeking out about the cool new tech I encountered during my annual safari to the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Like all CES events, CES 2019 showcased new tech toys pipelined for 2019 and alpha versions of what companies think will be cool and useful for the next few years in that signature big, flashy CES style.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 12.29.31 PM

     

    What I find especially cool about CES is how wildly across the map the mix of vendors and presenters in attendance are. E3 is big but limited to gaming tech. The same thing for events like DefCon and AI World,” Dr. Bolman said. But in the halls of CES, attendees experience technologies that range from Uber’s concept for a flying taxi quadcopter, to dancing robots, to Amazon’s tortoise-rimmed AR glasses, to smart belts. And about a thousand other things.

     

    After four days immersed in edgy new tech, I usually leave CES feeling like “The future is now.” As provost at the University of Advancing Technology, I seek out trends to bring back to students, classes and project builds. This year was no different.

     

    As I strolled through Eureka Park, I noticed a few themes that I’m taking back to campus with me and watching closely, including artificial intelligence, mainstream automounts and electric vehicles and sustainability.

     

    Artificial intelligence is going to be as commonly included in our tech designs as Internet connectivity has been over the past decade. This trend is just starting and accelerating. I encourage every student to add some level of AI to their toolkit before graduation. Several UAT AI and computer science faculty are of the mindset that full stack won’t be full stack without AI in the near future.

     

    Mainstream autonomous and electric vehicles are coming and will be the most disruptive change to transportation since the Interstate. For an intro peek into the momentum of this movement, Google what all car makers are planning to do with cabins and windshields. Also take a look at new tech vendors, like nVidia, that build these systems.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 10.07.38 AM

     

    Sustainability is making its way to technical designs and ideas. One of the award-winning innovations at CES 2019 was a hydrogen fuel-based power-assisted bicycle. This design won an innovation award and for incorporating a charging station designed to sit in a home garage and convert water to hydrogen fuel. I also saw numerous innovations on display that helped agriculture by eliminating the need for fossil fuels, recapturing energy and even pulling drinking water out of the air.

     

    Read about my favorite tech at CES 2019 here.

     

    Do you want to learn artificial intelligence skills and develop smart objects to help save the planet? Come make tech with me at UAT. Apply today.

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    My Favorite Tech at CES 2019


    I experienced tons of edgy, unique and, at times, borderline weird tech at CES 2019. But most vendors at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show presented products that aim to seamlessly infuse connectivity and artificial intelligence into people’s homes and lifestyles. The volume of inventions that focus on using these technologies to...

    I experienced tons of edgy, unique and, at times, borderline weird tech at CES 2019. But most vendors at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show presented products that aim to seamlessly infuse connectivity and artificial intelligence into people’s homes and lifestyles. The volume of inventions that focus on using these technologies to improve human’s lives and experiences nearly doubled from 2018. Entire halls encompassing hundreds of thousands of square feet were dedicated to this pursuit.

     

    To distill this trend down to a well-informed slice, take a look at all the hooks into home and lifestyle products that Amazon has linked to Alexa. It isn’t overly futuristic to paint a picture where in the morning you could be looking in the bathroom mirror, reading what you need to start the day, telling your home to “wake up” for you and asking your car to pull up and meet you outside for to drive you to work.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 11.31.14 AM

     

    Examples of tech meets health and wellness include sleep tech, such as the SmartSleep from Philips and the Addison Care Virtual Caregiver that can remind recommend nutrition plans and remind people to take their medication.

     

    AR was present at the show, but did not meet my expectations in most cases.

     

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    VR, user input devices and gaming are still a part of CES, but not a focal point. It felt like display technology hasn’t kept forward since last year, but the price is going down, and more vendors are getting in. That being said, here are some cool things I saw:

     

    • A company called Icaros had a VR flying platform that facilitates the feeling of first-person flight.
    • One of the coolest things I saw was a drone driven by hand gestures using an input glove at the Nordic IoT booth. I wasn’t able to dig in and see if the demo was rigged, but the smooth flight motions closely followed the hand gestures left, right, up and down. The gloves looked like wired-up bicycle riding gloves.
    • A couple of companies, such as Vuze, offer a 360-camera linked to a VR head-mounted display solution that easily immerses participants into live spaces (rather than CG-generated ones). One vendor was using this technology to help the elderly and other people with limited mobility experience worlds they don’t typically have access to.
    • A handful of vendors displayed AR glasses for industrial purposes. The applications of this tech include safety glasses that engineers and construction workers can use to pull up information and images out in the field and send live images of what they are seeing to experts located somewhere else.

     

    Overall, the VR/AR and display tech seemed more polished than last year, but there was not enough to leave me feeling that this tech is close to mainstream adoption. More cooking is required.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 10.07.49 AM

     

    Some stray observations that caught my attention and got me smiling:

     

    • One company demonstrated an ATM that handled bitcoin and other cryptocurrency transactions. You could purchase these currencies, pay bills with them and also exchange traditional currency.
    • If your booth didn’t have a drone, then you weren’t trying. Whether it was product relevant or not, every other booth had a drone. It wasn’t uncommon to see a drone hanging from the ceiling over a booth and when you asked “why?”, the reps would say “because drones are cool and people assume that you are on your tech game if you have one.”
    • To add to the spectacle, a builder stuffed a 75-foot yacht into the main hall. It was really cool looking and had people asking how they transported and then got it inside.
    • Boom boxes are back, and now they have LED lighting that syncs with the tunes!
    • And no, the adult entertainment expo no longer coincides with CES. That stopped back in 2012 when CES basically consumed all the space in Vegas.

     

    Want to make the next great tech innovation and show it off at a future CES? Come study and make tech with me at UAT. Apply today.

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    How to Network Your Way to a Job


    Eighty precent of jobs are not posted online. So how do you find those open jobs and the hiring managers? An over-looked way to network with industry professionals or like-minded individuals is to join a group. Hiring managers specifically look for people who proactively contribute to their...

    Eighty precent of jobs are not posted online. So how do you find those open jobs and the hiring managers? An over-looked way to network with industry professionals or like-minded individuals is to join a group. Hiring managers specifically look for people who proactively contribute to their community, present at events and mentor others. But the benefits of joining a group go beyond just networking. Groups give you the social life that many people may leave behind due to their commitments to work/family/school.  

     

     

    Story time! The first thing I did when I moved to Arizona was join a group that would provide me with that social aspect that I knew I would need to be successful. As an Australian, I grew up playing Australian Rules Football (footy) but stopped when I moved to the US for college. My graduate coursework and final project focused on how to expand the game here in the United States. I joined a local club just to see how it was. Within a few weeks, I felt like I had 30 new friends.

     

    Joining the Arizona Hawks has also helped me professionally. Not only am I actively networking, but my own graduate work is being used by the club. I am writing and creating content for them, which not only keeps my mind sharp, but gives me a way to improve my artistic passions.  

     

     

    Maybe joining a group is not as easy for you. Maybe you get nervous talking with new people. That feeling is totally normal. Try out these icebreakers:

     

    • Why did you come to the event tonight?
    • What do you think about [an exciting piece of relevant industry news]?
    • What’s your story?
    • What are you working on?
    • How did you hear about this event?
    • Where did you get your [bag/necklace/shoes]?
     

    Go into it understanding that networking and getting a job is not the only reason to join a professional group. It's okay to join a group for the pure fun of it all. If anything, it allows you to build communication and teamwork (hmm, wonder when those could come in handy?).

     

     

    Pro tip: Always remember to ask how you can help the other person.

     

    People will see right through insincere attempts to speed network your way to a job. Instead, join groups such as Girls in Tech PHX that focus on supporting the community and mentoring young people.

     

    Check out a few local groups that may pique your interest: 

     

    https://www.meetup.com/Phoenix-ReactJS/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Desert-Blockchain/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/phxmobi/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Central-Cyber-Security-Meetup/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/UX-in-Arizona/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/HackerNestPHX/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/AZ-Cyber-Warfare-Range/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Phoenix-VR-For-Good-Meetup/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Game-CoLab/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Outgoing-Introverts-of-Phoenix/ 

     

    Need help identifying groups to join in your area? Not sure what to say to your new connections? Reach out: career&industryservices@uat.edu!

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    3 Tips for Growing Your Personal Brand


    The web service BrandYourself (check it out!), correctly identifies the three pillars of successfully creating a personal brand:   Building a brand Building credibility/audience Targeting opportunities     Thankfully, I have a...

    The web service BrandYourself (check it out!), correctly identifies the three pillars of successfully creating a personal brand:

     

    1. Building a brand
    2. Building credibility/audience
    3. Targeting opportunities

     

     

    Thankfully, I have a background in marketing, public relations and strategic communication, so I know what I am talking about and can explain each of these pillars.

     

    Building a brand

     

    If you have come and seen me, you may have noticed that I usually begin student meetings with a simple prompt: Tell me about yourself. I meet with a lot of students, so this exercise isn’t just about trying to figure out who you are in a literal sense, but it is a way for me to see who you are in a broader sense. What do you do? What are you passionate about? What are some of your biggest accomplishments? What separates you from every other game designer who comes to see me? Your answer to this prompt is your brand.

     

    Once you have an answer for this, you translate it online. Don’t like being online? Too bad. You need to develop your brand online. This happens through the creation and development of different social media platforms—LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Portfolios, GitHub, Twitch, YouTube, Instagram, etc. Aim to have two personal accounts and two professional-facing accounts.

     

     

    My Professional Twitter Account

     

    If you already have accounts, clean them up. Make sure the messaging—the content in your posts—is the same across every platform. While each separate social media platform has a different target audience, it should still feel like it’s coming from a similar mindset or voice. For example, if I was to post about education initiatives on LinkedIn, I should also be using Twitter to engage with others working in higher education or perusing Medium to find the perfect articles to share on Facebook.

     

     

    Building Credibility/Audience

     

    Let your skills, abilities and accomplishments do the talking. Do you know how I am credible? I taught Business and Professional Communication at Texas Tech University. I have won awards for research in persuasion. A national organization uses my research. I know what I am talking about, so I engage with other like-minded people in an authentic and respectful way, use my insights and add to the ongoing conversation. Maybe you aren’t credible in that same way yet. Find another way to stand out. Clearly, you’re passionate about something. Look at the current landscape and find something that hasn’t been done yet.

     

    Building your audience can be difficult. There is no right way to go about it, but there is a wrong to do it. Do not, under any circumstance, buy followers! I will hunt you down and @ you until the cows come home. In the meantime, build your followers organically by adding comments, reaching out to influencers or gatekeepers and staying active online (post multiple times a week). The best thing to do? Watch how other people actively engage with others in a thoughtful way.

     

     

    Targeting Opportunities

     

    Once you have built up your profiles, capitalized on your credibility and found a target audience, you can proactively look for opportunities to increase your following. This will look different for everyone, but as an example, I will share with you something I did.

     

    I was surfing the web one day and came across Beautiful.AI, a presentation software startup. I used their product and decided to tweet at them. After a few tweets back and forth, I shared their product with others. Along the way, I made sure to engage with them on a regular basis. This then turned into an opportunity to beta test new products and services. Boom. That’s all it is. I noticed a company that had a good product, and I engaged with them on social media. I now get retweeted by them regularly (helps my brand), and I share their product with others (helps their brand). Win-win.

     

    Do you need help building your personal brand? Reach out to me on LinkedIn, Twitter or in-person on campus.

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    Preparing for a Career as a Disney Imagineer


    UAT Student Brett Butler’s experiences at Disney theme parks, resorts and cruises inspired him to join the maker movement. His dream job? “Working at Disney as an Imagineer!” The term Imagineer combines imagination and engineer. Brett definitely fits that description.   ...

    UAT Student Brett Butler’s experiences at Disney theme parks, resorts and cruises inspired him to join the maker movement. His dream job? “Working at Disney as an Imagineer!” The term Imagineer combines imagination and engineer. Brett definitely fits that description.

     

     

     

    Brett likes to make stuff, which makes him a perfect fit for the Digital Maker and Fabrication (DMF) program here at UAT. Since he arrived on campus in the fall of 2017, Brett has spent hours tinkering away in the UAT Maker Lab. He loves playing with the laser cutter and Formlabs high resolution stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer.

     

    Brett has been playing around with animatronics for years. He is currently building an animatronic elephant that can talk, blink and move its trunk. When Brett was in high school, he participated in the Technology Student Association’s animatronics national championship. His team created a fully animatronic bird that they 3D printed at school. “It had feathers, moved and completely worked,” Brett exclaimed.

     

     

     

    Brett’s friends have been pestering him to make another awesome creation using one of the 3D printers at UAT. He accepted their challenge and 3D-printed a working ukulele! Then his girlfriend told him that she wanted a violin.

     

    “I started off with a 3D-modeled violin that I used a photo reference for. From there, I printed it, checked it, printed, checked, and kept repeating until it worked,” Brett explained. “I’m actually going to have to reprint this once because it’s still not exactly perfect,” he added.

     

     

     

     

    Brett turns to his fellow Digital Maker and Fabrication peers and his favorite professor, Joseph Horen, for inspiration and collaboration. “I think DMF is one of the coolest programs here. You can create something and have it in front of you. You can hold it. I think that’s amazing,” he said.

     

    Students in the DMF program graduate with hands-on experience in produce design, product development, industrial design, digital fabrication, 3D modeling and embedded systems programming. Brett appreciates the project-based curriculum and capitalizes on Professor Horen’s offers to explore a topic or problem and then develop a project or solution and well, make it. “Joseph is always helping me figure out problems that I am having, and he’s helped me with some of the electronic components of the elephant,” Brett said.

     

    Big dreams push Brett to keep creating. “UAT is a cool place where I can make just about anything.” Brett will undoubtedly continue to make cool stuff throughout his time at UAT.

    Follow UAT on social media to keep up with Brett’s current projects and other cool tech on campus. We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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    Professor Vita-More Speaks at Extreme Futures Tech Festival


    Professor Natasha Vita-More gave a talk virtually to Microsoft Main Campus for the Extreme Futures Tech Festival. Great people and much fun!   The EFTF is a tech conference focused on emerging technology trends, across the tech sector. It covers the latest in ...

    Professor Natasha Vita-More gave a talk virtually to Microsoft Main Campus for the Extreme Futures Tech Festival. Great people and much fun!

     

    The EFTF is a tech conference focused on emerging technology trends, across the tech sector. It covers the latest in emerging technology, the trends but also social impact and emerging societal changes and where we are going with technology and where it affects us and business.

     

    In this ‘issue’ of EFTF we have topics from bio engineering, cybernetics (including a live demo of an implant procedure), artificial intelligence, cloud computing, maker trends, XR technologies (AR/VR and Wearables), IoT and many more.

     

    Click for more information on the Extreme Futures Tech Festival: http://transhumanity.net/extreme-futures-tech-fest-fall-2015/

     

    Professor Vita-More was also featured in an article called, The Science Surrounding Cryonics, co-authored by David W. Crippen, Robert J. Shmookler Reis, Ramon Risco, and herself, and can be found on the front page of MIT Technology Review.

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    Military Student Creates App for Army Physical Fitness Test


    Written by game programming student William Mann.   When I was a soldier in the U.S. Army, I was responsible for being able to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and for meeting the weight standards for my age, height, and gender. I struggled with obesity since childhood and this required constant effort on my part. I found myself...

    Written by game programming student William Mann.

     

    When I was a soldier in the U.S. Army, I was responsible for being able to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and for meeting the weight standards for my age, height, and gender.

    I struggled with obesity since childhood and this required constant effort on my part. I found myself consulting the various charts and tables quite often in my attempt to ensure I was in compliance. If I exceeded the weight limit, which I often did, my body fat percentage had to be calculated to see if I met this fall-back requirement. There were some complex calculations to be performed to measure body fat, and it was a bit tedious.

     

     

    EZJoe app by UAT military student EZJoe app by UAT military student

     

     

    After my time in the U.S. Army, I delved into mobile app development and I decided to create an app to help current soldiers keep up with these fitness and weight requirements. The app is called EZ Joe and can be found here on Google Play.

     

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