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ABOUT UAT
University of Advancing Technology is an elite, private college that serves its student body by fostering knowledge creation and academic excellence in an environment that embraces the young technophiles of the world. With three centers of research and a suite of technology-centered undergraduate and graduate degrees, the University is a recognized leader in technology education.

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    Cybersecurity Thought Leader Dr. Rebecca Wynn Shares her Best Career Advice


    University of Advancing Technology May 2019 honorary doctorate recipient Dr. Rebecca Wynn likes to go fast. As the Head of Information Security and Data Protection Officer (DPO) at Matrix Medical Network, Dr. Wynn leads the...

    University of Advancing Technology May 2019 honorary doctorate recipient Dr. Rebecca Wynn likes to go fast. As the Head of Information Security and Data Protection Officer (DPO) at Matrix Medical Network, Dr. Wynn leads the overall security strategy, security architecture development and security programs. She is always working on multiple projects at the same time, finding new ways to leverage cutting-edge risk management tools, machine learning and artificial intelligence to narrow the gap between a specific event detected on the network and first responders receiving actionable data.

     

    rebecca                          Dr. Rebecca Wynn 

     

    But she doesn’t always get to go fast. It took her more than six months to get her first job in cybersecurity. When a friend told her about a possible position opening up, Dr. Wynn reached out to the director of information security at that company. She had to keep in touch for several months until the job finally opened up. Then she went through a lengthy interview process and made it on a short list of potential hires.

     

    During that waiting period, Dr. Wynn spent her time learning and studying everything about the industry and information security. “I wanted to be ready to be a corporate asset immediately,” she said.

     

    Women have a long road to climb in the cybersecurity world, and Dr. Wynn doesn’t see that changing anytime soon. That’s why she recommends that women stay on their A game because certain people will always be looking and waiting for their female colleagues to fail.

     

    In order to get infosec jobs, women have to apply for them. Dr. Wynn has noticed that women routinely do not apply for jobs unless they meet every single qualification. Men, on the other hand, “just go for it.” Dr. Wynn wants more women to do and think the same. “Stick to your dreams and go for them. Good things will follow with confidence,” she said.

     

    What if you’re a student and not exactly sure what you want to do or how to find a job? Dr. Wynn has some homework for you. “Find out what sector energizes you and keeps you interested,” she said. Make a short list. Then reach out to alumni, members of the cybersecurity community or professionals who work at your target companies in your target positions. Try to set up 30-minute calls or meetings with at least five different people to get as much knowledge as possible. “Follow up with a thank you email, and always keep in contact,” she added.

     

    Everybody makes mistakes and encounters people they don’t particularly like throughout their careers. Dr. Wynn makes mistakes daily, and working with people who aren’t “type A go-getters” can be challenging for her. “The goal is to keep level headed and treat everyone with the same respect and professionalism,” she said.

     

    Dr. Wynn’s favorite part about her job is being able to go home at the end of the day and knowing that she made a difference. She believes that talents develop naturally when they are nurtured, so she recommends seeking out companies that appreciate hard work and talent and offer the opportunity to move up. “Never settle for not being the best you can be,” she said. Dr. Wynn sure doesn’t.

     

    Do you want to become a cybersecurity thought leader like Dr. Wynn? Check out our network security degree program today!

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    How to Recruit More Women in Tech


    We need more women in tech because we need more people in tech. Arizona has 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs. The U.S. has hundreds of thousands of vacant technology jobs, which cost the economy ...

    We need more women in tech because we need more people in tech. Arizona has 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs. The U.S. has hundreds of thousands of vacant technology jobs, which cost the economy billions of dollars. So, how do we attract more female computer scientists, data analysts, software engineers and infosec professionals?

     

    Communicating the value and need for soft skills in STEM fields might convince some women who feel like they don’t have a natural talent for technology to consider careers in tech. “I think some women see STEM careers as being more about hard math and science than the current and future reality of tech jobs being more about creativity and collaboration,” said Dr. Dave Bolman, the University of Advancing Technology provost and member of the Arizona Technology Council board of directors.

     

    Journalists, politicians and CEOs often lament the shortage of skilled technology workers. But in reality, a large contributing factor to the tech talent shortage is a lack of soft skills such as communication, teamwork, creativity, organization and flexibility.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-04-24 at 12.03.36 PMThe All-Female Cybersecurity Council of Arizona Board

     

    “Thanks to socialization, women often have an already-developed-and-tested ability for understanding things from someone else’s perspective, predicting needs and working in teams,” said Haylee Mills, a senior cybersecurity engineer at Charles Schwab and the director of workforce development for the Cybersecurity Council of Arizona. “All of these things are what a DevOps methodology attempts to foster by focusing on user stories, how to develop for the user and how to do that as a team,” Haylee said.

     

    Emphasizing soft skills upfront in technology job descriptions and the hiring process can attract more women to technology jobs, but in order to retain them, employers need to recognize their contributions. “I know many talented women who would thrive in tech who have just never been given credit for their ability to troubleshoot, organize and solve problems,” Haylee said.

     

    Another way to attract and retain top female tech talent is to “focus on building things that people and communities value and make the world a better place for everybody,” Dave said. If research indicates that women naturally gravitate toward careers that help people over careers that work with things, then showing them how technology improves people’s lives can help peak their natural interests. Companies can also do more to bridge the gap between the people who make technology and the end users.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-04-24 at 12.04.28 PMUAT Digital Media Professor Dapzury Valenzuela

     

    University of Advancing Technology Professor Dapzury Valenzuela also points to a lack of female mentors accessible to young girls. Organizations such as Girls in Tech Phoenix are helping bridge the gap with formal mentorship programs and fun mentoring meetups. “There are also a lot of co-working spaces advocating for more female entrepreneurs such as Co+Hoots Founder Jenny Poon,” Dapzury said. “These cohorts and collaborative spaces are helping to foster awareness and providing education to aspiring and established entrepreneurs alike,” Dapzury added.

     

    People—young girls included—like and remember stories. “One way to get girls excited about tech is to share stories of women like Marion Croak, who invented VOIP and holds more than 135 patents, and Lisa Gelobter, who invited animation on the Internet,” Dave said.

     

    We need more buy-in from teachers, principals and parents for extra-curricular activities in STEM. “The more we can join forces with academia, industry and parents, the better prepared our students will be when entering the workforce,” Dapzury said. Haylee also suggests reaching out to and collaborating with high school girls who have "an affinity for art, anime and gaming." 

     

    {% video_player "embed_player" overrideable=False, type='scriptV4', hide_playlist=True, viral_sharing=False, embed_button=False, width='640', height='320', player_id='9106474717', style='' %}

     

    That’s why Dapzury helped launch Immersive Teaching STEAM Academy (ITSA) that teaches young girls and boys 3D modeling, robotics, game development, VR and coding through a fun and exciting project-based learning model. “When you expose children to hands-on STEM activities at an early age, they are more likely to connect those learning outcomes to possible career paths in tech,” she said. 

     

    We’re headed in the right direction. “There is a large amount of talent in women, who may not have originally thought of tech or cybersecurity careers as an option, trying to reskill right now,” Halyee said. And every time Dave attends a middle school robotics competition, overnight game jam or science fair, he notes “at least half of the participants are energetic girls with confidence and great ideas.”

     

    Do you want to educate and excite the next generation of computer scientists and cybersecurity analysts? Check out our jobs board today!

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    How to Create a Killer YouTube Channel


    More than 30 million people around the world watch 5 billion YouTube videos every day. That’s a huge audience with a big appetite for video content. Video has always been a powerful marketing tool and one of the most engaging types of content. Students and job seekers—especially those in creative or competitive fields—can capitalize on the growing demand for video content by creating a...

    More than 30 million people around the world watch 5 billion YouTube videos every day. That’s a huge audience with a big appetite for video content. Video has always been a powerful marketing tool and one of the most engaging types of content. Students and job seekers—especially those in creative or competitive fields—can capitalize on the growing demand for video content by creating a YouTube channel that supports their personal brands and establishes them as thought leaders.

     

    Starting a YouTube channel is pretty simple. To start, you need a Gmail account, which most people already have. Once you’ve signed up, you’re ready to add your own personal flare to your channel.

     

    Start by adding a profile picture. Make sure you use something eye catching aligned with your personal brand such as your logo or a professional headshot. Then add your channel art. Create something that represents you! Make sure your channel art is high quality and on brand. The site PicMonkey is an excellent resource for creating your own channel art. You can find some examples of cool channel art ideas here.

     

    After you’ve added your unique charm to your channel, it’s time to start thinking about content. Many channels stick to a content theme such as music, eSports or fashion, but some channels create all kinds of content from career content to parenting tips and meal prep recipes. I prefer these eclectic channels because they offer a little bit of everything.

     

    iphone-1603478_1920

     

    If you aren’t a videographer or don’t own a fancy camera, don’t worry. Many YouTubers start out by filming videos on their phone, which is perfectly okay because of the high quality of today’s cell phone cameras. Simply set up your phone on a tripod and or find something to rest your phone against. Make sure you’re in frame, and then press record! Start your first video with a “get to know me” or a “Q&A” introduction video to set the tone and expectations for your viewers.

     

    Once you’ve filmed your video, it’s time to edit it. If you have a Mac, the best editor to use is iMovie. It’s a very simple editor for beginners. If you filmed a sit-down talking video, it shouldn’t be that hard to edit. All you need is a few simple cuts here and there, and you should be good.

     

    Next up, make your video thumbnail. Your thumbnail is very important because it is what catches the audience’s eye and ultimately makes them decide if they want to click on your video. Using the site PicMonkey, create your thumbnail with the size of 1280x720.

     

    Finally, when you have completed all of these steps, you can post your video! Upload it to YouTube on your channel. Make sure you pick the perfect title that matches your video content and includes SEO-optimized keywords to reach the widest audience. Fill in the description box, and don’t forget the tags.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-04-10 at 10.52.32 AM

    Alisha Marie's Beautifully Branded YouTube Channel

     

    Congrats on creating your YouTube channel and your first video! Now it’s time to keep up the content and grow! As famous YouTubers Alisha Marie and Remi Cruz would say, “Content, baby, content.”

     

    Want to learn how to create high-quality, professional marketing videos? Check out the Digital Video program at UAT today.

     

    And don't forget to follow UAT on YouTube. 

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    Why Technology Careers Work for Veterans


    Somehow, “You’re hired!” sounds better than the proverbial “Thank you for your service.” Veterans sacrifice a lot to serve and protect our country—time with their families, hobbies, careers, and sometimes their health or even their lives. After they’ve served, they face a big decision: What’s next? One viable option is a career in technology.   ...

    Somehow, “You’re hired!” sounds better than the proverbial “Thank you for your service.” Veterans sacrifice a lot to serve and protect our country—time with their families, hobbies, careers, and sometimes their health or even their lives. After they’ve served, they face a big decision: What’s next? One viable option is a career in technology.

     

    Veterans are known for their work ethic. They have to make decisions in hectic, fast-moving environments and adapt quickly to changing technology, weaponry and methodology. Although the stakes aren’t as high at a tech startup or SaaS company, passionate people who work quickly and have discipline tend to rise to the top.

     

    Knowing the types of people who succeed in the tech world and working on dev teams with several veterans at UAT made think that tech is a great fit for vets.

     

    Photo of Christopher Koon-1

     

    My friend Christopher Koon confirmed my theory. Christopher worked as a Radio Frequency Transmissions Systems Technician during his time with the United States Air Force. “That is a lot of words to basically say I worked on radios and satellites,” he said. Christopher’s time fixing technology inspired him to want to learn how to make technology.

     

    Before Christopher joined the military, he questioned his intelligence and capability. “I got poor grades and had a hard time focusing,” he admitted. “But during my service, I learned leadership, attention to detail, teamwork, critical thinking and self-motivation,” he said. Now Christopher is a 4.0 student, pursuing two bachelor’s degrees and constantly pushing to be the best version of himself.

     

    “I knew I wanted to learn from instructors with industry experience without sacrificing anything in terms of possible connections or the freedom to choose my own path,” Christopher said. He talked to a few developers and spent a lot of time on Google, considering the pros and cons of schools with game development programs. Ultimately, he chose to study game programming and computer science at UAT.

     

    Christopher felt a similar sense of community at UAT that he felt in the Air Force, and he was impressed by the project-based curriculum and one-on-one attention from faculty and staff. “I have created several games that I am proud of, and I’ve made some great friends at UAT,” Christopher said.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 3.49.19 PM

    @adobelife

     

    In order to compete for top-notch tech talent, technology companies and startups also put a lot of thought into culture and community, something many veterans miss when they leave the service. For example, Adobe has an entire Instagram account dedicated to company culture. They also strive to hire veterans and celebrate them once they get there.

     

    Christopher emphasized how much he learned about teamwork during his time with the Air Force, where he had to rely on his fellow service members and really got to know them on a personal level. Similarly, when you work on a dev team building software or making a video game, everyone has to work together to make it through sprints and ensure the code is bug free.

     

    Many of Christopher’s friends joined the Air Force because they wanted to make the world a better place. That desire also drew Christopher to tech. “Global warming, world hunger, world peace and even medicine can all be solved, fixed or improved through the use of technology,” Christopher said. Technology is in everything from cars to coffee makers, and it isn’t slowing down. “Tech will constantly propel mankind forward,” Christopher said. And he wants to go along for the ride.

     

    One day Christopher would like to get a job as a gameplay engineer at Amazon Game Studios, but right now he is focusing on graduating and shipping some indie titles.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 4.10.34 PM

     

    Do you want to earn a future-proof technology degree—or two—from UAT like Christopher? Reach out to our Military Liaison Tim Kane today: tkane[at]uat.edu! (He is awesome.)

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    We’re Called University Of Advancing Technology For A Reason…


    We seek out and partner with top tech execs all over the Valley. In fact, we’re so committed to advancing tech in Arizona that we started Perimeter83, a one-of-a-kind training for businesses and technology startup coworking space nestled right inside the UAT campus.    What does that mean for our students?   Perimeter83 attracts...

    We seek out and partner with top tech execs all over the Valley. In fact, we’re so committed to advancing tech in Arizona that we started Perimeter83, a one-of-a-kind training for businesses and technology startup coworking space nestled right inside the UAT campus. 

     

    What does that mean for our students?

     

    Perimeter83 attracts tech entrepreneurs that utilize the entire UAT campus for meetings, scrum sprints and day-to-day operations. These technophiles have access to technology and in-house talent for production, development and mentorship. Along with being surrounded by like-minded tech entrepreneurs, Perimeter83 hosts forward thinking events from some of the valley’s top technology experts.  You can learn about where tech is going in 2019 at our next event; AZ Tech Forecast 2019.  This interactive panel discussion will explore the technology forecast and trends we can expect to see in Arizona in the coming year. Our panelists will feature:

     

    Dr. David Bolman, Provost & Chief Academic Officer, University of Advancing Technology

    Steve Zylstra, President & CEO, Arizona Technology Council

    Chris Camacho, President & CEO, Greater Phoenix Economic Council

     

    Discussion will highlight goals for education and economic leadership focused on keeping talent in Arizona and building our technology workforce. Our panelists' goal, as well at UAT’s, is to see Phoenix become the new Tech Valley. Representing three growth-oriented sectors (higher education, technology and economic development) in the Phoenix Metro area, each of our panelists brings decades of experience to this candid talk and Q&A session in UAT’s theater.

    This gives our students and the public a unique opportunity to hear the insight, contribute to the discussion and take away some solid forecasting ideas about Arizona's 2019 tech horizon and beyond not to mention networking with Arizona’s top tech experts. 

     

    When:

    April 16th, 2019 2:00pm to 3:30pm

    Where:

    University of Advancing Technology Theater
    2625 W. Baseline Road, Tempe AZ 85283

     

    Why:

    Learn about where tech is going in 2019 and network with the Valley’s top tech experts

     

    RSVP:

    https://perimeter83aztechforecast2019.eventbrite.com

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    Creating Technology Solutions for Higher Education


    University of Advancing Technology alumnus Raymond Blackwood makes software that runs colleges. He geeks out about solving higher education problems through technology to ensure that colleges and universities of all sizes have the tools and processes necessary to manage student lifecycles as efficiently as...

    University of Advancing Technology alumnus Raymond Blackwood makes software that runs colleges. He geeks out about solving higher education problems through technology to ensure that colleges and universities of all sizes have the tools and processes necessary to manage student lifecycles as efficiently as possible. He also travels 40 weeks out of the year, collects Star Wars comics and takes his boat out on the water as much as he can.

     

    ray                                           Raymond Blackwood

     

    During his time at UAT, Raymond invented cool stuff, made movies with lightsabers and dabbled in hacking. He learned a lot about how to work with teams, communicate effectively and be open minded. Most importantly, he learned “how to use technology as a means to make people’s lives better.”


    After graduating with his Bachelor of Arts in Multimedia, Raymond got a job in the UAT IT Department. Not exactly what he had in mind after focusing his studies on digital animation. But Raymond had a knack for improving and automating processes. He spent 13 years at UAT, where he managed a lot of technology projects and a lot of data.

     

    Raymond’s experience in the UAT IT Department prepared him for his next career move at Campus Management Corp, where he is now the Vice President of Product Management. Raymond has continued to work on cool tech projects at Campus Management, where he collaborated with a team from Microsoft to release Dynamics 365 Higher Education Accelerator, which gives institutions access to an open source data model to rapidly build solutions for students, faculty, courses, test scores and more.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-03-22 at 10.04.27 AM         CampusNexus Occupation

     

    Campus Management encourages Raymond’s passion for automation. He created an application for students and advisors to identify jobs that students qualify for based on their program and major. He also helped build RENEE, an artificial intelligence chat bot and virtual advisor who engages students through text messaging, notifies them when important milestones are approaching and captures student feedback.

     

    Raymond has learned a lot throughout his illustrious career in high tech. “It takes more than creating a great product; you have to convince people to use it too,” he said. He always recommends “testing the market’s appetite” and making sure that revenue goals and costs align. He also learned the hard way not to hire people just because you are friends.

     

    Raymond’s advice to current students? “Enjoy the process of going to and being in college.”

     

    Do you want to learn how to improve processes in a technology environment like Raymond? Check out our exciting technology degree programs today.

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    How Build Your Brand on Instagram


    Navigating Instagram in the 21st century with all of the rinstas, finstas, flop accounts, "models" and crazy comments can be tough. But Instagram can be an incredibly helpful tool when building your personal brand, growing your...

    Navigating Instagram in the 21st century with all of the rinstas, finstas, flop accounts, "models" and crazy comments can be tough. But Instagram can be an incredibly helpful tool when building your personal brand, growing your business or job hunting.

     

    Instagram started out in 2010, it was released on October 6th. Back when Instagram was first created, people would upload blurry, dark or random objects with no rhyme or reason. The captions were terrible, and of course, filled with a bunch of hashtags. Those days are long gone. If you are caught using Instagram like we were in 2010, you’d probably be banned. Just kidding, but seriously.

     

    In 2019, Instagram is basically like a Linkedin, but for the arts and photography. Instagram is a creative marketing way to get attention from brands and build your fan base. Lots of Instagramers have professional pages, where they make money for just posting a picture of themselves looking good, hence the “Instagram model.” The Instagram model is a girl or boy who regularly posts beautiful pictures of themselves. Most Instagram models will also state in their bio that they’re an Instagram model. It may sound ridiculous, but it’s a thing. Companies and brands that sell luxury hotel rooms to designer shoes and purses pay Instagram models to help them sell their products or services. It can be very lucrative for the model.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-03-19 at 11.19.29 AM

    Instagram Model @lisamarie_schiffner

     

    Then, you have your Instagram Youtubers. Instagram Youtubers are very popular on Instagram, which is usually every Youtubers favorite app. Some Youtubers even use Instagram to kick off their careers. Some Youtubers killing it on Instagram include Casey Neistat, Lilly Singh and Grayson Dolan.

     

    To order to gain any traction on Instagram, you must have the perfect bio and the perfect feed. Your bio should include all your skills or titles, such as model, photographer, youtuber, etc. And don’t forget to link to your website! Your feed should be the same color grade, and your pictures should all be your best photos. Be sure to post often to get the best engagement on your profile. According to ExpertVoice, some of the best times to post on Instagram to maximize engagement include Sunday at 5 p.m., Monday at 7 p.m., Thursday at 7 a.m. and Saturday at 12 a.m.

     

    photoshoot-2913930_1920

     

    Ready to revamp your Instagram? Archive any pictures that you don’t like or want anyone to see. For example, if you posted a bad selfie or didn't quite figure out the color grade, you can simply archive old posts to hide them from your feed. Now, post three blank white or any three solid color pictures on your feed. This is how you start a new “Insta theme.” Once you’ve posted your blank transition pictures, find your preset. A preset is a set or adjust—a value that controls the operation of a device—in advance of its use. Your new feed needs to match, so you want to pick your favorite preset to use on all your pictures. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to post the best pictures of yourself, or better yet, go take a photoshoot with your best friend and get some new Instagram model worthy pictures.

     

    Lastly, were going to get serious. You can really grow a brand for yourself through Instagram. Using the right hashtags—but not too many!—following the right people and gaining followers can really help you in your journey. "Comments are rivaling Instagram feeds and Stories for importance," UAT Social Media Manager Ashley Murry said. "You can use the comments section to ask questions that spark engagement, make customers feel special or add authenticity to your brand voice," Ashley added.

     

    If you haven't started using Instagram Stories, you should get on that ASAP. More than 300 million people watch Instagram Stories every day! They have become so popular that they blew snapchat out of the race. Many young people, including myself, have ditched Snapchat and went straight for Instagram Stories. Instagram stories are a great way to reach and engage with your followers. Interactive influencers create the best engagement because they’re giving their followers what they want, recognition!

     

    Companies look for influencers every day to showcase their new products, but they’re specifically looking for influencers with high amounts of followers and engagement. Using the correct hashtags and gaining followers can get you there. One way to find the right hashtags is to simply search what hashtag is trending at the moment.

     

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    Now you are all set to launch your new Instagram like a professional Instagrammer. Most importantly, have fun with it and get those brand deals, girl!

     

    Want to learn how to produce high-quality, professional photos and videos for social media like me? Check out UAT's Digital Video degree program today!

     

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    Arizona Businesses Face a Changing Cyber Landscape


    Arizona businesses face evolving privacy laws, enforcement practices and cyber crimes. That’s why the Phoenix Business Journal invited some of Arizona’s leading cybersecurity and legal experts to discuss the cyber problems facing Arizona’s businesses and offer solutions at the ...

    Arizona businesses face evolving privacy laws, enforcement practices and cyber crimes. That’s why the Phoenix Business Journal invited some of Arizona’s leading cybersecurity and legal experts to discuss the cyber problems facing Arizona’s businesses and offer solutions at the Cybersecurity Forum earlier this week. The University of Advancing Technology has been teaching cybersecurity for more than 20 years, which is why the PBJ team invited UAT Provost Dr. Dave Bolman to moderate the panel discussion for the second year in a row.

     

    Privacy and consumer protection laws continue to change and so do enforcement practices. So far, the Arizona Attorney General hasn’t prosecuted a single information breach, but that does not mean he won’t in the future. Many companies don’t realize that hackers aren’t just after their customer data. Cyber criminals also pursue intellectual property information. “Think about how much of your organization’s competitive information shows up in your emails,” Dave told the audience.

     

    New technology is exposing new industries to cyber threats. For example, agriculture is more connected than ever. But how many Arizona farmers are thinking about cybersecurity? With the advent of new information security technology and products, the landscape of liability is also changing. Arizona small business owners should consult legal experts like Osborn Maledon’s William Furnish to better understand who is truly responsible when a breach occurs.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-03-15 at 9.50.50 AM

     

    Business owners should also consider looking into cyber risk insurance, which is becoming a big business. But people need to know how to ask what’s covered and what’s not. It’s always a good idea to consult a cybersecurity lawyer.

     

    Cyber criminals are also finding new ways to exploit small businesses to reach bigger targets. For example, hackers responsible for the massive Target breach broke in through a small HVAC company that contracted with the mega retailer. Moving forward, companies of all sizes should consider vendor risk management.

     

    Risk is not black and white; it’s a spectrum. Businesses must decide how much risk they are willing to take on, but it’s easy to handicap your business if the mindset is “No trust, no risk.” Arizona businesses can consult the experts at Terra Verde to determine what works best for them and learn how to create value from security and compliance investments.

     

    The first step in protecting your organization is knowing what data you want to protect and then evaluating all the places where that information is stored. Dump any data you don’t need. “Clean your own house first,” Dave said. The next step is making sure all of your vendors and business partners are on the same page.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-03-15 at 9.10.36 AM

     

    Are you ready to secure your business? Reach out to Terra Verde Sr. Security Manager Jacques Lucas to start the conversation.

     

    Want to learn how to fight cyber crime and protect people’s data? Check out Arizona's first NSA-Certified Center of Academic Excellence cybersecurity degree program at the University of Advancing Technology.

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    Arizona's Fight Against the Tech Talent Shortage


    Right now, there are 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in Arizona alone. Nationally, we need an additional 400,000 security analysts, network engineers, vulnerability researchers, pen testers and other professionals to fight cybercrime and protect data. The Obama Administration estimated that the US would have 1.4 million computer science jobs by 2020—but only 400,000 computer science...

    Right now, there are 7,000 unfilled cybersecurity jobs in Arizona alone. Nationally, we need an additional 400,000 security analysts, network engineers, vulnerability researchers, pen testers and other professionals to fight cybercrime and protect data. The Obama Administration estimated that the US would have 1.4 million computer science jobs by 2020—but only 400,000 computer science graduates to fill them.

     Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 9.21.46 AM

     “The AZ tech community, like the tech community at large, is facing a huge talent shortage gap,” Carine Dieude, an entrepreneur and Arizona tech community advocate. “It’s not an easy career. It is crucial to provide support to a wider demographic interested in tech,” she added. That’s exactly what she is doing at Girls in Tech Phoenix.

     

    Girls in Tech PHX partnered with a local Microsoft store to offer free YouthSpark Workshops for girls and boys ages 10–12. Students who attend these hands-on workshops learn about robotics, coding, public speaking, mixed reality and videography.

     

    Middle schoolers and high schoolers who are ready to dive deeper into robotics, artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things can check out Robot Factory. Robot Factory is an after-school program for students who want to break into the black box, build circuit boards, tinker with Raspberry Pi and learn real-world embedded systems programming skills with AZ Hyperloop Team Co-Founder Lynne Nethken!

     

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    Robot Factory

     

    Lynne works as a robotics engineer at 10 Imaging, a technology company that brings awareness to everyday devices. The 10 Imaging team recently moved into UAT’s on-campus coworking space Perimeter83. UAT Robotics & Embedded Systems students have the opportunity to help Lynne with Robot Factory's STEM classes.

     

    UAT also helps hundreds of Girl Scouts earn coding badges every summer. (And UAT faculty and staff buy all the cookies in the spring. UAT Bursar Renne Grauberger has the goods.) But how do we get more college students and working adults interested in computer science, keep them engaged and then get them ready for careers?

     

    {% video_player "embed_player" overrideable=False, type='scriptV4', hide_playlist=True, viral_sharing=False, embed_button=False, width='1280', height='624', player_id='7459835363', style='' %}

     

    Perimeter83 helps to close the gap between students and industry by bringing industry to campus. Insight Vice President of Global Business Transformation and IoT SME Curt Cornum just signed up for a designated desk space in the P83 Study. He brings an infectious energy to campus. 

     

    UAT professors proactively partner with industry on real-world projects, which students can often earn credit for as a special topics course. For example, Dr. Jill Coddington’s computer science and artificial intelligence students are collaborating on an AI transcription project with a neurosurgery organization. “There are fun challenges as some of the medical terminology is not standard mainstream English words used every day,” Dr. Coddington said.

     

    Carine and the rest of the fabulous Girls in Tech PHX team do a lot to engage and support the next generation of devs while they are in school and after they graduate. “Mentorship is not an everyday activity…it is a support system we can call on when we need help, advice or a new skill set,” Carine said. Girls in Tech PHX makes it easy for young developers and computer science students to connect with professionals who are already killing it in their fields online and in person.

     

    University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman has also been thinking about adults who want to get into tech (or would be a good fit and don’t even know it) but already have degrees in business, communications, history, biology or psychology. “If you have a degree, you likely already know how to think, problem solve and bring ideas together in ways that make sense to people. You simply need the technical skills involved with securing information and writing software,” Dave said.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-02-06 at 3.39.00 PM

     

    UAT’s innovative graduate and certificate programs address the lack of education options available to individuals who have degrees but want to retool their knowledge. Students can complete tech-intensive, 8-week modules such as Cloud Computing, Big Data, Algorithms and Patterns, Social Engineering, Information Assurance or Change Management as stand-alone units or combine multiple modules to earn a master’s degree.

     

    Want to fight the tech talent gap and future-proof your career? Apply today!

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    Arizona Has a Thriving Tech Community


    Earlier this week the Arizona House of Representatives invited University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman to the Capitol to present on technology trends and workforce needs in Arizona.   ...

    Earlier this week the Arizona House of Representatives invited University of Advancing Technology Provost Dr. Dave Bolman to the Capitol to present on technology trends and workforce needs in Arizona.

     

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    “It was easy,” Dave said, because “Arizona is a great place to be an innovator.”

     

    The combination of a pro-business government with an earnest interest in disruptive idea experimentation, a budding tech talent pool and beautiful weather makes Arizona an ideal location to launch a tech startup or work for one AND live a life full of hiking on mountains and brunching on patios.

     

    The Arizona FinTech Sandbox encapsulates Arizona’s commitment to innovation. The Sandbox enables business and entrepreneurs to test out innovative financial products or services by providing access to a limited Arizona market without forcing innovators to spend time and money obtaining state licensures or changing laws.

     

    “Fintech is already a disruptive $30-billion industry, and it’s only going to continue to shake things up,” Dr. Bolman said. “But Europe and countries like the UK and Estonia are leading the way,” he noted. How can the U.S. keep up?

     

    Disruption by innovative Arizona companies goes beyond fintech and includes other traditional industries such as real estate, the car buying industry and even mattresses.

     

    “Arizona is bursting with innovative tech companies, from small startups like Myndshft, to established organizations like Axosoft (#itwasneveradress), to giant companies like McKesson.” Said Carine Dieude, Girls in Tech Phoenix mentorship chair and awesome human being.

     

    AZ Blockchain Initiative Co-Founder Melissa Portocarrero Armas agrees that Arizona is a great place for businesses. “Tech companies in Arizona are doing what they’re supposed to do: They’re growing, but they’re also engaging,” which makes Arizona a great place for people and community too. “There are a lot of incubators, community organizations and nonprofits that focus their attention and resources in developing our local talent,” Melissa said.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 11.41.58 AM

     

    Girls in Tech Phoenix is one of those organizations. Last year, they launched LEAD, a female-first mentoring and social platform powered by artificial intelligence. This year, they’re hosting monthly mentoring meetups #CrushItWednesdays. “It is hard to advance one’s career in tech, but we want to shift that conversation and talk about how we can make it easier, promote positive change and actively get involved,” Carine said. The Cybersecurity Council of Arizona has a similar initiative, Cybersecurity Career Conversations, for Arizona’s infosec community.

     

    Even the big the companies are catching on to the mentorship trend.

     

    Screen Shot 2018-08-14 at 11.37.21 AM

     

    McKesson developers and designers collaborate with software engineering students at the 2018 McKHackathon at UAT.

     

    Last summer, Carine collaborated closely with McKesson leadership to host a hackathon at UAT, which brought together developers, scientists and designers from McKesson with students and community members. “The McKHackathon is a testimony to McKesson’s leadership in technological innovation and commitment to pushing their developers and scientists to think outside of the box and remain open to the next big ideas that could improve lives around the world,” Carine said.

     

    Generosity is a common—and practiced—theme here in Phoenix, which has a rising reputation as the (affordable) “Silicon Desert.” Just try reaching out to anyone who uses the hashtag #yesphx. But many groups are working to expand the tech love beyond the sprawling metropolis of 1.6 million people.

     

    For example, this year PHX Startup Week is hosting events all around the Valley from Mesa to Phoenix to Gilbert. Glendale—the Silicon Mountains?—is home to 1,000 technology companies that employ 41,000 people. And the Tucson tech community continues to thrive with support from the Arizona Technology Council.

    Screen Shot 2019-02-01 at 11.37.18 AM

    Melissa and her partners at the AZ Blockchain Initiative recently launched Project Phoenix, a collaborative partnership, building a mesh network to bring internet to South Phoenix and rural Arizonans. “Big things are coming to Arizona, and we’re paving the way for a more diverse and inclusive tech industry," she said.

     

    Do you want to earn a high-powered technology degree and contribute to the awesome Arizona tech community? Apply to UAT today!

     

    P.S. You can text "Girls in Tech" to 27000 to get updates about their events and resources.

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    Top 3 Tech Themes from CES 2019


    I’m still geeking out about the cool new tech I encountered during my annual safari to the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Like all CES events, CES 2019 showcased new tech toys pipelined for 2019 and alpha versions of what companies think will...

    I’m still geeking out about the cool new tech I encountered during my annual safari to the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). Like all CES events, CES 2019 showcased new tech toys pipelined for 2019 and alpha versions of what companies think will be cool and useful for the next few years in that signature big, flashy CES style.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 12.29.31 PM

     

    What I find especially cool about CES is how wildly across the map the mix of vendors and presenters in attendance are. E3 is big but limited to gaming tech. The same thing for events like DefCon and AI World,” Dr. Bolman said. But in the halls of CES, attendees experience technologies that range from Uber’s concept for a flying taxi quadcopter, to dancing robots, to Amazon’s tortoise-rimmed AR glasses, to smart belts. And about a thousand other things.

     

    After four days immersed in edgy new tech, I usually leave CES feeling like “The future is now.” As provost at the University of Advancing Technology, I seek out trends to bring back to students, classes and project builds. This year was no different.

     

    As I strolled through Eureka Park, I noticed a few themes that I’m taking back to campus with me and watching closely, including artificial intelligence, mainstream automounts and electric vehicles and sustainability.

     

    Artificial intelligence is going to be as commonly included in our tech designs as Internet connectivity has been over the past decade. This trend is just starting and accelerating. I encourage every student to add some level of AI to their toolkit before graduation. Several UAT AI and computer science faculty are of the mindset that full stack won’t be full stack without AI in the near future.

     

    Mainstream autonomous and electric vehicles are coming and will be the most disruptive change to transportation since the Interstate. For an intro peek into the momentum of this movement, Google what all car makers are planning to do with cabins and windshields. Also take a look at new tech vendors, like nVidia, that build these systems.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 10.07.38 AM

     

    Sustainability is making its way to technical designs and ideas. One of the award-winning innovations at CES 2019 was a hydrogen fuel-based power-assisted bicycle. This design won an innovation award and for incorporating a charging station designed to sit in a home garage and convert water to hydrogen fuel. I also saw numerous innovations on display that helped agriculture by eliminating the need for fossil fuels, recapturing energy and even pulling drinking water out of the air.

     

    Read about my favorite tech at CES 2019 here.

     

    Do you want to learn artificial intelligence skills and develop smart objects to help save the planet? Come make tech with me at UAT. Apply today.

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    My Favorite Tech at CES 2019


    I experienced tons of edgy, unique and, at times, borderline weird tech at CES 2019. But most vendors at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show presented products that aim to seamlessly infuse connectivity and artificial intelligence into people’s homes and lifestyles. The volume of inventions that focus on using these technologies to...

    I experienced tons of edgy, unique and, at times, borderline weird tech at CES 2019. But most vendors at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show presented products that aim to seamlessly infuse connectivity and artificial intelligence into people’s homes and lifestyles. The volume of inventions that focus on using these technologies to improve human’s lives and experiences nearly doubled from 2018. Entire halls encompassing hundreds of thousands of square feet were dedicated to this pursuit.

     

    To distill this trend down to a well-informed slice, take a look at all the hooks into home and lifestyle products that Amazon has linked to Alexa. It isn’t overly futuristic to paint a picture where in the morning you could be looking in the bathroom mirror, reading what you need to start the day, telling your home to “wake up” for you and asking your car to pull up and meet you outside for to drive you to work.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 11.31.14 AM

     

    Examples of tech meets health and wellness include sleep tech, such as the SmartSleep from Philips and the Addison Care Virtual Caregiver that can remind recommend nutrition plans and remind people to take their medication.

     

    AR was present at the show, but did not meet my expectations in most cases.

     

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    VR, user input devices and gaming are still a part of CES, but not a focal point. It felt like display technology hasn’t kept forward since last year, but the price is going down, and more vendors are getting in. That being said, here are some cool things I saw:

     

    • A company called Icaros had a VR flying platform that facilitates the feeling of first-person flight.
    • One of the coolest things I saw was a drone driven by hand gestures using an input glove at the Nordic IoT booth. I wasn’t able to dig in and see if the demo was rigged, but the smooth flight motions closely followed the hand gestures left, right, up and down. The gloves looked like wired-up bicycle riding gloves.
    • A couple of companies, such as Vuze, offer a 360-camera linked to a VR head-mounted display solution that easily immerses participants into live spaces (rather than CG-generated ones). One vendor was using this technology to help the elderly and other people with limited mobility experience worlds they don’t typically have access to.
    • A handful of vendors displayed AR glasses for industrial purposes. The applications of this tech include safety glasses that engineers and construction workers can use to pull up information and images out in the field and send live images of what they are seeing to experts located somewhere else.

     

    Overall, the VR/AR and display tech seemed more polished than last year, but there was not enough to leave me feeling that this tech is close to mainstream adoption. More cooking is required.

     

    Screen Shot 2019-01-25 at 10.07.49 AM

     

    Some stray observations that caught my attention and got me smiling:

     

    • One company demonstrated an ATM that handled bitcoin and other cryptocurrency transactions. You could purchase these currencies, pay bills with them and also exchange traditional currency.
    • If your booth didn’t have a drone, then you weren’t trying. Whether it was product relevant or not, every other booth had a drone. It wasn’t uncommon to see a drone hanging from the ceiling over a booth and when you asked “why?”, the reps would say “because drones are cool and people assume that you are on your tech game if you have one.”
    • To add to the spectacle, a builder stuffed a 75-foot yacht into the main hall. It was really cool looking and had people asking how they transported and then got it inside.
    • Boom boxes are back, and now they have LED lighting that syncs with the tunes!
    • And no, the adult entertainment expo no longer coincides with CES. That stopped back in 2012 when CES basically consumed all the space in Vegas.

     

    Want to make the next great tech innovation and show it off at a future CES? Come study and make tech with me at UAT. Apply today.

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    How to Network Your Way to a Job


    Eighty precent of jobs are not posted online. So how do you find those open jobs and the hiring managers? An over-looked way to network with industry professionals or like-minded individuals is to join a group. Hiring managers specifically look for people who proactively contribute to their...

    Eighty precent of jobs are not posted online. So how do you find those open jobs and the hiring managers? An over-looked way to network with industry professionals or like-minded individuals is to join a group. Hiring managers specifically look for people who proactively contribute to their community, present at events and mentor others. But the benefits of joining a group go beyond just networking. Groups give you the social life that many people may leave behind due to their commitments to work/family/school.  

     

     

    Story time! The first thing I did when I moved to Arizona was join a group that would provide me with that social aspect that I knew I would need to be successful. As an Australian, I grew up playing Australian Rules Football (footy) but stopped when I moved to the US for college. My graduate coursework and final project focused on how to expand the game here in the United States. I joined a local club just to see how it was. Within a few weeks, I felt like I had 30 new friends.

     

    Joining the Arizona Hawks has also helped me professionally. Not only am I actively networking, but my own graduate work is being used by the club. I am writing and creating content for them, which not only keeps my mind sharp, but gives me a way to improve my artistic passions.  

     

     

    Maybe joining a group is not as easy for you. Maybe you get nervous talking with new people. That feeling is totally normal. Try out these icebreakers:

     

    • Why did you come to the event tonight?
    • What do you think about [an exciting piece of relevant industry news]?
    • What’s your story?
    • What are you working on?
    • How did you hear about this event?
    • Where did you get your [bag/necklace/shoes]?
     

    Go into it understanding that networking and getting a job is not the only reason to join a professional group. It's okay to join a group for the pure fun of it all. If anything, it allows you to build communication and teamwork (hmm, wonder when those could come in handy?).

     

     

    Pro tip: Always remember to ask how you can help the other person.

     

    People will see right through insincere attempts to speed network your way to a job. Instead, join groups such as Girls in Tech PHX that focus on supporting the community and mentoring young people.

     

    Check out a few local groups that may pique your interest: 

     

    https://www.meetup.com/Phoenix-ReactJS/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Desert-Blockchain/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/phxmobi/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Central-Cyber-Security-Meetup/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/UX-in-Arizona/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/HackerNestPHX/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/AZ-Cyber-Warfare-Range/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Phoenix-VR-For-Good-Meetup/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Game-CoLab/ 

    https://www.meetup.com/Outgoing-Introverts-of-Phoenix/ 

     

    Need help identifying groups to join in your area? Not sure what to say to your new connections? Reach out: career&industryservices@uat.edu!

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    3 Tips for Growing Your Personal Brand


    The web service BrandYourself (check it out!), correctly identifies the three pillars of successfully creating a personal brand:   Building a brand Building credibility/audience Targeting opportunities     Thankfully, I have a...

    The web service BrandYourself (check it out!), correctly identifies the three pillars of successfully creating a personal brand:

     

    1. Building a brand
    2. Building credibility/audience
    3. Targeting opportunities

     

     

    Thankfully, I have a background in marketing, public relations and strategic communication, so I know what I am talking about and can explain each of these pillars.

     

    Building a brand

     

    If you have come and seen me, you may have noticed that I usually begin student meetings with a simple prompt: Tell me about yourself. I meet with a lot of students, so this exercise isn’t just about trying to figure out who you are in a literal sense, but it is a way for me to see who you are in a broader sense. What do you do? What are you passionate about? What are some of your biggest accomplishments? What separates you from every other game designer who comes to see me? Your answer to this prompt is your brand.

     

    Once you have an answer for this, you translate it online. Don’t like being online? Too bad. You need to develop your brand online. This happens through the creation and development of different social media platforms—LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Portfolios, GitHub, Twitch, YouTube, Instagram, etc. Aim to have two personal accounts and two professional-facing accounts.

     

     

    My Professional Twitter Account

     

    If you already have accounts, clean them up. Make sure the messaging—the content in your posts—is the same across every platform. While each separate social media platform has a different target audience, it should still feel like it’s coming from a similar mindset or voice. For example, if I was to post about education initiatives on LinkedIn, I should also be using Twitter to engage with others working in higher education or perusing Medium to find the perfect articles to share on Facebook.

     

     

    Building Credibility/Audience

     

    Let your skills, abilities and accomplishments do the talking. Do you know how I am credible? I taught Business and Professional Communication at Texas Tech University. I have won awards for research in persuasion. A national organization uses my research. I know what I am talking about, so I engage with other like-minded people in an authentic and respectful way, use my insights and add to the ongoing conversation. Maybe you aren’t credible in that same way yet. Find another way to stand out. Clearly, you’re passionate about something. Look at the current landscape and find something that hasn’t been done yet.

     

    Building your audience can be difficult. There is no right way to go about it, but there is a wrong to do it. Do not, under any circumstance, buy followers! I will hunt you down and @ you until the cows come home. In the meantime, build your followers organically by adding comments, reaching out to influencers or gatekeepers and staying active online (post multiple times a week). The best thing to do? Watch how other people actively engage with others in a thoughtful way.

     

     

    Targeting Opportunities

     

    Once you have built up your profiles, capitalized on your credibility and found a target audience, you can proactively look for opportunities to increase your following. This will look different for everyone, but as an example, I will share with you something I did.

     

    I was surfing the web one day and came across Beautiful.AI, a presentation software startup. I used their product and decided to tweet at them. After a few tweets back and forth, I shared their product with others. Along the way, I made sure to engage with them on a regular basis. This then turned into an opportunity to beta test new products and services. Boom. That’s all it is. I noticed a company that had a good product, and I engaged with them on social media. I now get retweeted by them regularly (helps my brand), and I share their product with others (helps their brand). Win-win.

     

    Do you need help building your personal brand? Reach out to me on LinkedIn, Twitter or in-person on campus.

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    Preparing for a Career as a Disney Imagineer


    UAT Student Brett Butler’s experiences at Disney theme parks, resorts and cruises inspired him to join the maker movement. His dream job? “Working at Disney as an Imagineer!” The term Imagineer combines imagination and engineer. Brett definitely fits that description.   ...

    UAT Student Brett Butler’s experiences at Disney theme parks, resorts and cruises inspired him to join the maker movement. His dream job? “Working at Disney as an Imagineer!” The term Imagineer combines imagination and engineer. Brett definitely fits that description.

     

     

     

    Brett likes to make stuff, which makes him a perfect fit for the Digital Maker and Fabrication (DMF) program here at UAT. Since he arrived on campus in the fall of 2017, Brett has spent hours tinkering away in the UAT Maker Lab. He loves playing with the laser cutter and Formlabs high resolution stereolithography (SLA) 3D printer.

     

    Brett has been playing around with animatronics for years. He is currently building an animatronic elephant that can talk, blink and move its trunk. When Brett was in high school, he participated in the Technology Student Association’s animatronics national championship. His team created a fully animatronic bird that they 3D printed at school. “It had feathers, moved and completely worked,” Brett exclaimed.

     

     

     

    Brett’s friends have been pestering him to make another awesome creation using one of the 3D printers at UAT. He accepted their challenge and 3D-printed a working ukulele! Then his girlfriend told him that she wanted a violin.

     

    “I started off with a 3D-modeled violin that I used a photo reference for. From there, I printed it, checked it, printed, checked, and kept repeating until it worked,” Brett explained. “I’m actually going to have to reprint this once because it’s still not exactly perfect,” he added.

     

     

     

     

    Brett turns to his fellow Digital Maker and Fabrication peers and his favorite professor, Joseph Horen, for inspiration and collaboration. “I think DMF is one of the coolest programs here. You can create something and have it in front of you. You can hold it. I think that’s amazing,” he said.

     

    Students in the DMF program graduate with hands-on experience in produce design, product development, industrial design, digital fabrication, 3D modeling and embedded systems programming. Brett appreciates the project-based curriculum and capitalizes on Professor Horen’s offers to explore a topic or problem and then develop a project or solution and well, make it. “Joseph is always helping me figure out problems that I am having, and he’s helped me with some of the electronic components of the elephant,” Brett said.

     

    Big dreams push Brett to keep creating. “UAT is a cool place where I can make just about anything.” Brett will undoubtedly continue to make cool stuff throughout his time at UAT.

    Follow UAT on social media to keep up with Brett’s current projects and other cool tech on campus. We’re on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

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    Professor Vita-More Speaks at Extreme Futures Tech Festival


    Professor Natasha Vita-More gave a talk virtually to Microsoft Main Campus for the Extreme Futures Tech Festival. Great people and much fun!   The EFTF is a tech conference focused on emerging technology trends, across the tech sector. It covers the latest in ...

    Professor Natasha Vita-More gave a talk virtually to Microsoft Main Campus for the Extreme Futures Tech Festival. Great people and much fun!

     

    The EFTF is a tech conference focused on emerging technology trends, across the tech sector. It covers the latest in emerging technology, the trends but also social impact and emerging societal changes and where we are going with technology and where it affects us and business.

     

    In this ‘issue’ of EFTF we have topics from bio engineering, cybernetics (including a live demo of an implant procedure), artificial intelligence, cloud computing, maker trends, XR technologies (AR/VR and Wearables), IoT and many more.

     

    Click for more information on the Extreme Futures Tech Festival: http://transhumanity.net/extreme-futures-tech-fest-fall-2015/

     

    Professor Vita-More was also featured in an article called, The Science Surrounding Cryonics, co-authored by David W. Crippen, Robert J. Shmookler Reis, Ramon Risco, and herself, and can be found on the front page of MIT Technology Review.

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    Military Student Creates App for Army Physical Fitness Test


    Written by game programming student William Mann.   When I was a soldier in the U.S. Army, I was responsible for being able to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and for meeting the weight standards for my age, height, and gender. I struggled with obesity since childhood and this required constant effort on my part. I found myself...

    Written by game programming student William Mann.

     

    When I was a soldier in the U.S. Army, I was responsible for being able to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and for meeting the weight standards for my age, height, and gender.

    I struggled with obesity since childhood and this required constant effort on my part. I found myself consulting the various charts and tables quite often in my attempt to ensure I was in compliance. If I exceeded the weight limit, which I often did, my body fat percentage had to be calculated to see if I met this fall-back requirement. There were some complex calculations to be performed to measure body fat, and it was a bit tedious.

     

     

    EZJoe app by UAT military student EZJoe app by UAT military student

     

     

    After my time in the U.S. Army, I delved into mobile app development and I decided to create an app to help current soldiers keep up with these fitness and weight requirements. The app is called EZ Joe and can be found here on Google Play.

     

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