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ABOUT UAT
University of Advancing Technology is an elite, private college that serves its student body by fostering knowledge creation and academic excellence in an environment that embraces the young technophiles of the world. With three centers of research and a suite of technology-centered undergraduate and graduate degrees, the University is a recognized leader in technology education.

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    Game-Job-Fair2

    Game Job Fair

    (Jan. 6, 2017)

    Calling all game studies students! The 2017 Spring UAT Game Studios development teams are looking to add new members! Are you an artist, game programmer, game designer, or marketeer? Power up at the Game Job Fair in the Theater on January 13, at 10:30 a.m. to join a team! The 2017 Spring Games in development are the following games: Morpheus (New) Reign...

    Calling all game studies students! The 2017 Spring UAT Game Studios development teams are looking to add new members!

    Are you an artist, game programmer, game designer, or marketeer? Power up at the Game Job Fair in the Theater on January 13, at 10:30 a.m. to join a team!

    The 2017 Spring Games in development are the following games:

    • Morpheus (New)
    • Reign and Rebellion (New – Game Industry Veterans)
    • KalqueLord (Returning)
    • Conseclicker (Returning)

    Students in the UAT Game Studios class are trained in a real-world environment where they interact directly with game designers, game programmers, artists and marketing gurus to create a video game from initial concept to completed work.

    Learn more about the Greenlight process for selecting game projects for development in the UAT Game Studios.

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    Spray N Prey from Monster Vault Entertainment

    Alumni Releases New Game: Spray N Prey from Monster Vault Entertainment

    (Jan. 3, 2017)

    We recently received an update from Mike Densmore, an alumni who dual majored in Game Design and Game Art & Animation at UAT, and he has some exciting news to share about new mobile game Spray ‘N’ Prey, published by his...

    We recently received an update from Mike Densmore, an alumni who dual majored in Game Design and Game Art & Animation at UAT, and he has some exciting news to share about new mobile game Spray ‘N’ Prey, published by his indie game company Monster Vault Entertainment.

    Spray ‘N’ Prey is a bullet hell shooter that pits you against a never ending onslaught of Monsters. Let the bullets fly as you unleash Hell with explosions to even the odds to keep the murder spree going. Compete for top spot bragging rights in the Murder Machine ranking system. The game is designed to keep the blood bath going by updating the environments and monsters for seasonal packs and more. In addition, updates to the wave system will create a progressive challenge for the player and game devs have also implemented power ups to increase the pace of carnage to keep the kill counts high.

    See the latest trailer for Spray ‘N’ Prey on YouTube.

    Monster Vault Entertainment game devs are constantly crafting more updates and levels for the game. Incorporating more achievements and a leaderboard to keep players competitive controls for the mobile game use the gyro sensors for fast paced rotation.

    Check back as Spray ‘N’ Prey will be releasing a Steam version very soon!

    Currently, you can purchase Spray ‘N’ Prey on Google Play for $.99.

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    Phoenix Global Game Jam held at UAT

    Phoenix Global Game Jam Held at UAT Jan 20-22

    (Jan. 2, 2017)

    New Year, new game jam! Collaborate and compete with game developers from all over Arizona and the world in the 2017 Phoenix Global Game Jam! Whether you’re a grizzled game dev veteran or a total newb, you’re invited. Join a team and collaborate for 48 hours...

    New Year, new game jam! Collaborate and compete with game developers from all over Arizona and the world in the 2017 Phoenix Global Game Jam!

    Whether you’re a grizzled game dev veteran or a total newb, you’re invited. Join a team and collaborate for 48 hours to build an awesome game.

    Come alone, start a team with your friends, or hop onto a team at the jam.

    This year’s Phoenix Global Game Jam is sponsored by Clique, Red Bull, and the University of Advancing Technology. The prizes are going to be awesome – so stay tuned!

    Program Itinerary:

    Day 1 (January 20) – Arrival and Team Formation

    4 pm – 5pm: Check in

    5 pm – 6 pm: Announcements & Keynote

    6 pm: Form Teams & Begin Work

    Day 2 (January 21) – Work

    11 am: Deadline to create user profile and game page on globalgamejam.org

    Day 3 (January 22) – Work and Awards Ceremony

    3 pm: Deadline for submitting games

    4:30 pm – 7 pm: Presentations and Judging – Each team has 5 minutes to do a short presentation

    Let’s make awesome games together!

    Please help us spread the word on social media and mountain tops. @gamecolab @cliqueAPI @UATedu #PHXGGJ17

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    Greenlight pitches and team awards

    New Games Greenlit for Development in Spring 2016

    (Dec. 13, 2016)

    The UAT Game Studios class held a daylong event to close out the Fall semester of game development. During the morning segment team leads handed out awards to hard working students on each team who shined in their role of game development. Student Jesse Rogers gave a short...

    The UAT Game Studios class held a daylong event to close out the Fall semester of game development.

    During the morning segment team leads handed out awards to hard working students on each team who shined in their role of game development.

    Student Jesse Rogers gave a short presentation on tips for being successful in UAT Game Studios. One of his biggest takeaways was to get involved in game jams because you think quickly, brainstorm lots of ideas, work under pressure to meet a deadline much like in the real world, figure out your skills, work with new people and in the end have a proof of concept or prototype created.

    Next, new game pitches were heard for approval, giving game students a chance to present their game idea and what the owner hypothetically would need to create the game. A total of 10 games were pitched to a full theater of game developers. After all of the game concepts were presented, game professors deliberated on which games they thought were feasible with the talent pool at UAT. Sometimes they have to turn a game down because they may not have enough programmers or artists to complete the game within the semester.

    Kalque Lord game at Greenlight

    Kalque Lord game at Greenlight

    The games chosen for game development in the UAT Game Studios for the Spring 2016 semester are:

    • Morpheus (New)
    • Reign and Rebellion (New – Game Industry Veterans)
    • KalqueLord (Returning)
    • Conseclicker (Returning)
    • Island Survivor (Returning)

    Professor Lynn Understiller also announced opportunities for internships for game students. Please see Lynn about the following internships: Facebook HUB for UAT Game developers, UAT Game Studios Website development, The Academy: hosting challenges and support for Game Artists, Game Job Fair: Sign Ups & Rogue Developer Support.

    Internships Available - Ask Professor Lynn Understiller for more info

    Internships Available – Ask Professor Lynn Understiller for more info

    In the evening, the Greenlight Celebration welcomed game enthusiasts and the public to acknowledge and demonstrate the games developed in UAT Game Studios over the fall semester.

    Congratulations to the following UAT Game Studios teams who completed work on their games during the fall semester.

    • Short Links Golf (external client)
    • KalqueLord (external client)
    • Conseclicker
    • Source Watch (SIP Project)
    • Oddity
    • Couch Game

    We’re proud of your hard work and dedication to your games this semester!

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    Busta Worm demo with Jesse Rogers and Mayor Mark Mitchell

    Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell Highlights UAT at State of City Address

    (Dec. 7, 2016)

    In preparation for the 2016 State of the City Address on Dec. 2, Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell spent a few hours at UAT familiarizing himself with UAT’s new Virtual Reality degree by testing out ...

    In preparation for the 2016 State of the City Address on Dec. 2, Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell spent a few hours at UAT familiarizing himself with UAT’s new Virtual Reality degree by testing out “Bust’a Worm”, a new virtual reality game students created for the HTC Vive, originally developed for a 48-hour game jam.

    Mayor Mitchell also met with students Kenneth Vorseth and Ryan McDonald as they demonstrated their cost effective version of a VR head mounted display (HMD) unit, a product they have been innovating all semester and have hopes of bringing the finished version to the consumer market.

    Mayor Mitchell was impressed by the level of detail put into these projects and the passion for technology that oozed from each UAT student he came into contact with on campus.

    VR Head Mounted Display (HMD) demo at State of the City Address

    VR Head Mounted Display (HMD) demo at State of the City Address

    Provost Dr. David Bolman provided Mayor Mitchell with more examples of how UAT is innovating right in Tempe’s backyard with involvement in SciTech’s Chief Science Officer Training, 48-Hour Film Challenges, the WRCCDC Cyber Competitions, Global Game Jams and VEX Robotics Competitions, Southwest Makerfest, Geeks Night Out and more, all amazing talking points that were relayed to a full room of Tempe businesspeople at the State of the City Address.

    You can watch the presentation given by Mayor Mark Mitchell in the video below.

    The State of the City Address provides a unique opportunity for the public to hear the mayors thoughts on the local social and economic climate along with his vision for the growth and future of Tempe and Arizona. As a tech leader in higher education, UAT is educating and priming new problem solvers in technology to change the future of cyber security, game design, virtual reality, digital video, robotics, computer science and more.

    Mayor Mark Mitchell speaks about UAT's endeavors in technology at the 2016 State of the City Address

    Mayor Mark Mitchell speaks about UAT’s endeavors in technology at the 2016 State of the City Address

    UAT keeps forging the path of innovation in Tempe, the state of Arizona and the country for technology innovation. Although the fall semester will soon wind down for the holiday season, students are polishing the final version of games to be played at the Greenlight Celebration on Dec. 9, and adding the last minute tweaks on their Student Innovation Projects for the SIP Fair on Dec. 15.

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    UAT Greenlight Celebration

    Greenlight Celebration

    (Nov. 28, 2016)

    You’re invited to the 2016 Fall Greenlight Celebration, an event for University of Advancing Technology (UAT) to acknowledge the fantastic work of its UAT Game Studios students. The Greenlight Celebration offers them the opportunity to demonstrate...

    You’re invited to the 2016 Fall Greenlight Celebration, an event for University of Advancing Technology (UAT) to acknowledge the fantastic work of its UAT Game Studios students. The Greenlight Celebration offers them the opportunity to demonstrate the games they’ve been working on for the last semester to fellow students and to the public.

    The UAT Game Studios is a multidisciplinary collaboration of students across undergraduate and graduate degrees and on-ground and online programs consisting of mostly game design and game programming students, as well as art and animation majors to form well-rounded game development or game dev teams. 

    • What: 2016 Fall Greenlight Celebration
    • Where: UAT Theater and Commons
    • When: Dec. 9, 2016 from 6-8 p.m.
    • Why: To celebrate the amazing work of UAT Game Studios students and demo their games
    • Who: UAT Game Studios students
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    Crimson Nights using Axosoft Scrum Management Software

    Game Students Keep Communication Flowing with Scrum Management Tool, Axosoft

    (Sep. 19, 2016)

    Photo: Kenny Ryan (left) checks the Axosoft to-do list with Crimson Nights artist Terrence Miller. The UAT Game Studios class brings together students from different disciplines such as game programming, game design, art and ...

    Photo: Kenny Ryan (left) checks the Axosoft to-do list with Crimson Nights artist Terrence Miller.

    The UAT Game Studios class brings together students from different disciplines such as game programming, game design, art and animation and digital video to develop video games from the initial concept to a completed work. For every game dev project, each team member has their own set of responsibilities and must meet specific milestones to completion along the way.

    At UAT, students may work physically on campus or virtually from their homebase as online students. No matter what the students’ physical location, everyone needs to communicate and be on the same page to successfully design a completed a game. UAT Game Studios emphasizes Agile project management with Scrum and has partnered with Axosoft to use their tools to keep communication flowing through the development teams.

    Axosoft offers a Scrum project management tool, or ticketing system, that allows people to share goals and objectives between members. This helpful tool has enabled students to communicate, assign responsibilities and keep the team accountable.

    Recently Axosoft’s Content Strategist Trista Sobeck came out to UAT to see her company’s software in action! See her blog about her experience at the UAT Summer Greenlight Celebration here.

    Game students Jesse Rogers and Tyler Feddeler demo The Couch Game to Axosoft's Trista Sobeck and Tania Katan at the UAT Summer Greenlight Celebration | Photo by Jake Turocy

    Game students Jesse Rogers and Tyler Feddeler demo The Couch Game to Axosoft’s Trista Sobeck and Tania Katan at the UAT Summer Greenlight Celebration | Photo by Jake Turocy

    Game Design student Kenny Ryan, a member of the Crimson Nights game development team has found Axosoft to be helpful. Kenny said, “Each week, we looked at what needed to be done and broke it down by skill sets.”

    Kenny organized the task by type such as “Design,” “Art,” “Programming” and “Online” and each member in that discipline could see a list of their assigned work for the day.

    Once the Crimson Nights team got to a certain point in the development process, Kenny was able to take a more freeform approach assigning more long-term goals to the artists and designers, but not listed as a specific task to a specific person. Kenny saw the benefit from both strategies, but admits more was accomplished during the direct assignment phase versus the goals approach phase where it took more effort to complete more elaborate tasks over a longer period of time.

    Killian Davies using Axosoft in UAT Game Studios class

    Killian Davies using Axosoft in UAT Game Studios class

    Axosoft enabled Kenny and his team to keep up with their work and see what tasks are on their to-do list without having to send emails back and forth or meet with Kenny face-to-face, which can hold up the process. When a team is investing so many hours per week, per semester, it’s important to make that time count!

    In addition to their weekly sprint logs, all students enrolled in the UAT Game Studios are required to submit screenshots of their Axosoft personal release planners and team burndown charts. This helps them determine the velocity of their team’s game production and gauge their own skills through timeboxing.

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    Austin Game Conference- volunteers needed

    Volunteer Coordinators Needed for Austin Game Conference

    (Aug. 16, 2016)

    Hey UAT students… The Austin Game Conference wants you! Submit your application to become a Volunteer Coordinator at the Austin Game Conference, but don’t wait, there are a limited number of positions available. Volunteers gain...

    Hey UAT students… The Austin Game Conference wants you!

    Submit your application to become a Volunteer Coordinator at the Austin Game Conference, but don’t wait, there are a limited number of positions available.

    Volunteers gain full access to AGC when they are not working. The Volunteer Coordinator will work with volunteers to insure a percentage of their time is left open to attend portions of the conference.

    Job requirements: hard-working, knowledgeable, enthusiastic people who are interested in serving as members of the support team

    Consider what skills and interests you have that would make you a valuable volunteer.

    Apply here for the Volunteer Coordinator position for Austin Game Conference, Sept. 20, 21, 22 at the Austin Convention Center.

     

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    Bubble Wrap PopAPalooza

    Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza Now on Google Play

    (Aug. 10, 2016)

    Do you have friends or siblings who like to pop Bubble Wrap? Most people enjoy this simple, yet satisfying task, which is why it’s the perfect idea for a video game! “Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza” was produced by Ara Shirinian,...

    Do you have friends or siblings who like to pop Bubble Wrap? Most people enjoy this simple, yet satisfying task, which is why it’s the perfect idea for a video game!

    Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza” was produced by Ara Shirinian, Principal Designer at WePlay Media and Tyler Weiss, a UAT student dual majoring in Game Programming and Advancing Computer Science, in partnership with Sealed Air, the official Bubble Wrap brand.

    Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza is a fun game with fundamentals which resemble the old “Whack A Mole” carnival game but replaces the mole with fun activities and gameplay derived from playing with Bubble Wrap.

    “We saw a great opportunity to do something fun with Bubble Wrap and noticed that while there are several Bubble Wrap style games available, none really did the idea of Bubble Wrap justice,” Shirinian said.

    Watch the official commercial for Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza!

    So how did UAT student Tyler Weiss get involved? He heard about WePlay Media‘s competition for game ideas involving Bubble Wrap. Tyler and friend Mike Citrin were matched up with Ara Shirinian to get started on the project. Over the course of a year, Tyler worked on this game as the lead programmer between taking a full load of classes and working a job on the side. Tyler, Mike, Ara and a few outsourced artists and backend developers were able to bring Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza to completion.

    This clever and simple gameplay lets the player go at their own pace, but speeds up the faster you can go. The game was designed with almost an infinite ceiling of performance, continually giving players the chance to improve and learn how to play the game better.

    Bubble Wrap PopAPalooza

    Bubble Wrap PopAPalooza

    Within each stage, there are four different goals to achieve. The player can decide which goal to focus on each round or attempt to fulfill all four goals in one stage, which presents quite a challenge. This feature was designed specifically to create a cool dynamic where playing for goal A is a different experience from playing for goal B, and so on, massively increasing playability.

    There are 40 different stages to unlock and play, with new features, obstacles and abilities introduced as you progress with more stages and features coming in future updates.

    Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza has fun power-ups that don’t require real money purchases, allowing players to reach their full potential in the game.

    While playing, beware of hazards such as beetles, bombs and protective metal domes that make the bubble popping experience much more exciting.

    Bubble Wrap: Pop A Palooza is now available in the Google Play store, download for free and get popping today!

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    Crimson Nights game animation featured in Show No Mercy film

    Show No Mercy Featuring Student Game Animation

    (Aug. 4, 2016)

    Over the past few semesters, UAT Game Studios students developed a  game called Crimson Nights, which is a multiplayer dungeon crawler with a retro arcade feel. Crimson Nights developers were...

    Over the past few semesters, UAT Game Studios students developed a  game called Crimson Nights, which is a multiplayer dungeon crawler with a retro arcade feel.

    Crimson Nights developers were introduced to a film crew, who were in the process of producing a film called “Show No Mercy” and they wanted to have a video game displayed on the arcade machine in their film. The filmmakers loved Crimson Night’s retro arcade style and decided it was perfect for their film.

    Over a weekend, the development team got to work and sent over some ideas for the film crew. From there, Crimson Nights got their first big break in cinema!

    • Kenny Ryan, Lead Designer, created the character head, weapons and collected all of the parts needed.
    • Terrence Miller, Lead Artist, worked on the title screen art.
    • Jake Turocy, Character Artist, worked on the character body.
    • Zak Kaszubowski, Environment, Decals and Effects Artist, created the props.
    • Kendal Cormany, Programming Management and Mechanics, worked on animations.
    • Jersey Calderwood, Lead Programmer, worked on programming the menus for navigation.

    See the trailer including Crimson Night’s contribution to the film, “Show No Mercy” in the video below.

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    Game On Expo

    Game On Expo

    (Aug. 1, 2016)

    Game enthusiasts, it’s time to get your game on because the Game On Expo is back! Taking place at the Mesa Convention Center on August 5-7, the Game On Expo is the largest gaming convention in Arizona! The word on the street is that this year is expected to be even bigger and better than last...

    Game enthusiasts, it’s time to get your game on because the Game On Expo is back!

    Taking place at the Mesa Convention Center on August 5-7, the Game On Expo is the largest gaming convention in Arizona! The word on the street is that this year is expected to be even bigger and better than last year’s inaugural event, so don’t miss out!

    What is the Game On Expo?
    It’s the largest gaming convention in Arizona, including table top and retro/modern video games. You can buy and test games, shop the vendor hall, and attend panels with industry designers, leaders and pro players! Attendees can participate in multiple game tournaments, dress up for the cosplay contest, enter the tabletop gaming room, play free play arcade games and more!

    UAT is joining in on the fun this year! Look for students representing UAT Game Studios at the Game On Expo and ask to demo their awesome games. Professor Ben Reichert will also have information about Game CoLab, a co-working space for game developers in Arizona, which acts as a video game development incubator and community advocate for local game developers.

    UAT Game Studios students speaking on panel at Phoenix Comicon- June 2016

    UAT Game Studios students speaking on panel at Phoenix Comicon- June 2016

    Student Panelists
    UAT game students have the opportunity to share their knowledge of game development and speak on a panel - UAT Game Studios: Teams Leads Perspective on Development on Friday 4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. in Palo Verde III. This panel will contain the following students: Tyler Ann Cook (Game: The Deadliest War), Kenny Ryan (Game: Crimson Nights), Jesse Rogers (Game: Couch Game), and Donald Schepis (Game: Happy Skies).

    If you have a passion for games, come out to the Game On Expo for a fun-filled weekend and get your game on!

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    Reasons to play PokemonGo at UAT

    10 Awesome Reasons to Play Pokémon Go

    (Jul. 28, 2016)

    At University of Advancing Technology, we’ve seen an invasion of Pokémon Go hunters roaming the campus in search of Pokémon since the game was released on July 6. In speaking with Professor Maureen Beam, we came up with ten awesome reasons to play Pokémon Go! Please see our ideas below. 1. Helps with...

    At University of Advancing Technology, we’ve seen an invasion of Pokémon Go hunters roaming the campus in search of Pokémon since the game was released on July 6. In speaking with Professor Maureen Beam, we came up with ten awesome reasons to play Pokémon Go! Please see our ideas below.

    1. Helps with depression and anxiety
    Many students have commented on how the game has helped them make new friends and overcome depression and the social anxiety that comes from meeting someone for the first time. There is an instant bond when you are playing Pokémon Go and see groups of other people playing Pokémon Go at the same park or location.

    2. Map reading skills
    It’s easy to rely on Navigation systems in today’s world, but a fun, interactive game like Pokémon Go, can help users learn how to read a map and learn about their surroundings.

    3. Cooperation
    Students can cooperate and work together to guard their gyms. At UAT, it’s common for students to collaborate on projects together so now they see Pokémon Go as a big scavenger hunt on campus. When one student catches a rare Pokémon, it’s likely they will tell all their friends in the area so they have a chance to catch ‘em all, too! There is also a way to team up with other teams to battle the mutual enemy who currently holds leadership of the gym. (Example: Team Valor (red) and Team Instinct (yellow) can team up to take over a gym controlled by Team Mystic (blue).)

    4. Raises self-esteem
    In Pokémon Go, when you do something positive, like level up, catch a rare Pokémon or take control of a gym after winning a battle, you feel good about yourself. Gratification is something that younger students really need as they mature.

    5. Promotes family bonding
    Planning a family outing just got easier! Take your family to a local park or shopping center to catch Pokémon. You can compete as a family or individually and either way you’re still interacting together and having fun! Take funny screenshots of each other with the Pokémon characters or just enjoy the family bonding experience.

    6. Organizational skills
    Pokémon Go is also a good tool to help improve organizational and strategizing skills. In order to advance to higher levels and catch stronger Pokémon, you need to hatch eggs, catch Pokémon, upgrade your Pokémon, and hit Poké Stops to collect balls. At gyms, you need to have stronger Pokémon to win so it’s smart to strategize the best way to upgrade the Pokémon before a battle and also how to heal your Pokémon to regain strength after the battle.

    7. Active lifestyle
    Students are more active as they must walk around to catch Pokémon Go opposed to most other types of video games that enable a more sedentary lifestyle. We’ve also seen some students riding their bikes around playing Pokémon Go to cover more ground and catch more Pokémon quickly.

    8. Healthy competition
    Students and faculty are interacting in a fun, competitive manner in the halls, between classes and at lunch. They are often comparing which Pokémon they have caught, asking which team they’re on and talking about their challenges and eevee-lutions!

    9. Increase leadership skills
    In life, you can’t always be a leader. In Pokémon Go, there are opportunities for all players to become leaders. If your Pokemon trains at a gym and wins the battle, your character takes leadership of the gym – until someone else wins a battle at that gym. You can feel good about winning a battle and use your leadership skills to put a team of people in place to guard the gym in preparation for the next battle.

    10. Stress relief
    Playing Pokémon Go is a great way to release stress, let go of tension and get immersed in a fun atmosphere. What better way to overcome a stressful day, than to chase adorable Pokémon in your neighborhood?

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    Rooster Teeth Guardians

    Real Life: Im a Rooster Teeth (RTX) Guardian A Game Students Perspective

    (Jul. 25, 2016)

    Game Design student Tyler Ann Cook made it her mission to return to Rooster Teeth (RTX) as a Guardian volunteer in 2016 and with her foot in the door from volunteering the previous year, she was ecstatic to learn she was accepted once again! Upon her return to UAT, we wanted to find out more about the event and...

    Game Design student Tyler Ann Cook made it her mission to return to Rooster Teeth (RTX) as a Guardian volunteer in 2016 and with her foot in the door from volunteering the previous year, she was ecstatic to learn she was accepted once again! Upon her return to UAT, we wanted to find out more about the event and her role as a Guardian.

    Learn about Tyler Ann’s experience in the Q&A below:

    Q. Can you tell us more about Rooster Teeth and your role as a volunteer?
    A. The motto of Rooster Teeth is “where gaming meets the internet” and allows for people in the gaming community to connect with their role models and friends. Rooster Teeth as a whole is a very welcoming community that feels like one giant family at times. RTX brings like-minded people together from all walks of life. Having a common interest in gaming, makes it easier to make friends and to strike up a conversation, whether commenting on the latest RWBY episode, discussing the latest podcast topic or pondering the most impossible achievement in the last Let’s Play. It’s like the people at RTX are my people.

    As a Guardian, it’s your responsibility to ensure that the event runs smoothly. We do it all, from registration to organizing lines and running the panel rooms and expo hall, to ensuring that special guests are on time to for signings and appearances. Guardians are the sea of people in and around and behind the scenes of the event that make sure RTX goes according to plan. We foster relationships between attendees, allowing those who are too shy to introduce themselves to have a safe place to make new friends.

    Tyler Ann Cook volunteering at RTX

    Tyler Ann Cook volunteering at RTX

    Q. What were your duties?
    A. I was a personal assistant (PA) so I was assigned to one of the special guests and it was my job to keep track of this person, guard them, escort them to their appearances, ensure they were fed and hydrated, and essentially I was their contact person to provide whatever they needed throughout the weekend. My tips for success are to always have water, snacks, sharpies and hand sanitizer available.

    Q. How were you selected as a volunteer?
    A. There is an online application one must submit prior to the convention each year. I was a Guardian last year and already had a foot in the door from my previous experience. I kept an eye on the website and Twitter feed waiting for the application to drop and then applied right away. The application includes questions such as prior experience with conventions, role requests, and experience you have that you think would be beneficial to whatever role offered.

    Q. What did you learn?
    A. The power of networking and making positive connections with people in other departments – in my experience as a PA you end up working with most every other job that exists, so it’s smart to work together when possible. I found that ensuring you have positive relationships with everyone also ensures that when things go wrong, you have ample backup to help fix it. It also helps to ensure nothing does go wrong in the first place.

    For example, there was a panel that took a turn for the worst really quickly from the standpoint of Guardians. Attendees loved it and the special guests were having a great time. However, no one informed the Guardians there would be alcohol or excessive amounts of drinking and hence we were not prepared to deal with extremely drunk special guests. There was one other PA and myself at the panel and we were scrambling to figure out how to deal with the situation. I spoke to the lead panel Guardian for the room and between his assistant, myself, and the other PA, we were able to figure out how to deal with the situation, handle it, and effectively ensure everyone was safe, and that the crowds were handled efficiently. After this unexpected issue, the two panel Guardians, the other PA and I all ended up becoming really close and knew that together we could diffuse any situation.

    Q. What was RTX like?
    A. RTX is a whirlwind. That’s really the only way to describe it. You barely sleep, you don’t stop moving for the entire three days that the convention runs. You are exhausted and blissfully happy, yet stressed out of your mind, your whole body hurts and your emotions are on a rollercoaster ride. But when it’s all over and done with, you wouldn’t give it up or change it for the world. You are sad it’s over, and immediately miss all of your new friends, and start counting down the days until RTX next year.

    Rooster Teeth Guardians working at RTX

    Rooster Teeth Guardians working at RTX

    Q. Did you meet any industry leaders?
    A. No. This is a community gaming convention, not an industry gaming convention. Rooster Teeth is known for their Let’s Plays and creating content (videos, shows, etc.) about video games and using video games in their creation. One of their most known works is Red vs. Blue which is the longest running web series and started as a machinama based animation style show recorded using the earliest Halo games. It has been on air for over 10 years and is on its 14th season.

    Q. Was this a paid opportunity?
    A. This was not a paid opportunity. This was a strictly volunteer position. The reason the majority of Guardians that I know volunteer and work is simply because of their intense love for Rooster Teeth and desire to help the community members have a wonderful experience.

    Q. How does this impact your degree? What benefits did this experience offer you as a student?
    A. RTX gave me the chance to talk about games and really connect with other people who love games as much as I do. Much like E3, RTX is a conference devoted to seeing and experiencing the latest innovations in gaming and sharing ideas, thoughts and experiences with peers. I had an opportunity to get feedback on what a large portion of the gaming community likes and doesn’t like; simply through conversation. It is not a chance to network or playtest games; however it is a really wonderful opportunity to just talk about games and have that social interaction. As a student, I worked with students from the US and around the world. In addition to making a ton of new friends, I made connections. At RTX, professional networking is not allowed however, the casual networking aka the connections you make by working together and making friends with others is encouraged. I made a lot of connections that I can call on if needed at a future point in my life. But right now, I’m counting down the days until RTX 2017!

    “I’m getting misty eyed at the airport because I just don’t want to leave! I can’t wait til RTX2017 when I can do it all again!”

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    PokemonGO invades UAT

    Pokémon GO Invades UAT

    (Jul. 15, 2016)

    Pokémon GO was released a week ago and already local businesses are reporting profit gains, social media is creating hilariously relatable memes...

    Pokémon GO was released a week ago and already local businesses are reporting profit gains, social media is creating hilariously relatable memes and news outlets are reporting on the unique situations ordinary citizens – turned “Pokémon hunters” have encountered. The game’s popularity shot to the top of the App store in a matter of hours. It’s no longer a question of who is playing Pokémon GO, but who’s not playing Pokémon GO.

    Here at UAT, we’re no different. In fact, we have three Poké Stops on campus and usually one stop has a lure, or a lure module, which causes more Pokémon to appear in location. Our students and faculty are placing lures at Poké Stops regularly throughout the day to attract more players.

    Pokemon Go Lure

    Pokemon Go Lure

    UAT is already a close-knit campus, but the bond of the Pokémon hunter transcends student and faculty boundaries. Now, in the café, students and instructors alike are sharing their victories and challenges, their “eevee-lutions” and their server-freezing woes.

    There’s even a Pokémon gym across campus! Gyms are places where hunters can train their Pokémon’s to battle each other and take ownership of the gym, and currently the blue team is the reigning champion! Professor Hue Henry even joked over lunch that for the first time in history, he can truthfully say that after work he’s going to the gym.

    Rumor has it that higher level players attract higher level Pokémon and at UAT, we happen to have a lot of high level players. Here’s a map of user-submitted Poké Stops around the Valley.

    PokemonGo

    Technology is often cited as a way to advance and move toward a more sustainable or desirable future, but games like Pokémon GO also prove that social interactions and the landscape and manner in which we bond are also going digital.

    “One of the things that’s amazing about Pokémon Go, is it’s not just for hardcore gamers. New game enthusiasts are getting involved and searching for Pokémon, too,” said Game Programming Professor Hue Henry, a faculty member who has been immersed in the game.

    Professor Hue Henry playing PokemonGO

    Professor Hue Henry playing PokemonGO

    Despite some of the criticisms that the game has met and some of the real challenges it faces like server traffic, overloading and risky behaviors such as driving while trying to catch a Pikachu on the freeway, it’s been remarkable to see the engagement around UAT’s campus.

    As Professor Jill Brumand said, “Seeing a group of students braving the Arizona heat in search of a Jolteon or the strange kinship many players share with strangers wandering through the park with their faces aglow and their fingertips tapping, certainly make Pokémon Go a phenomenon that will not soon be forgotten.”

    So how did Pokémon Go know where to place these Poke Stops? Many Pokémon hunters have heard of or have played a game called Ingress. Ingress is an augmented-reality, massive, multiplayer, online location-based game created by Niantic, which laid the foundation for instances of how many players are in a location. Ingress players submitted locations based on cool local landmarks such as cemeteries and churches. You can submit your own location for Ingress. Naturally, UAT has clusters of players on campus and so Pokémon Go created Poké Stops around our campus to meet the popular demand suggested by Ingress players. The locations submitted for UAT are the dorms at UAT Founder’s Hall, the UAT sign and the South Mountain trail map behind the dorms. There is now an option to edit or remove a location, as well.

    Poké Stop at UAT

    Poké Stop at UAT

    Professor Hue Henry said, “Given the general popularity and nostalgia factor of Pokémon, I think the game will stick around for a while. It’s more than just the AR component to gamers. Collection games are hugely popular. Right now, only 151 Pokémon have been released, but the Pokémon Universe has over 700 creatures to collect, so I don’t see the phenomenon going away any time soon.”

    You know all about Pokémon Go, so now what? Well like they say, “Gotta catch ‘em all!”

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    Greenlight Celebration

    Summer Greenlight Celebration for Game Students

    (Jul. 11, 2016)

    You’re invited to the 2016 Summer Greenlight Celebration, an event for University of Advancing Technology (UAT) to acknowledge the amazing work of its UAT Game Studios students by offering them the opportunity to demonstrate the games they’ve been working on for the last semester to fellow students and to the...

    You’re invited to the 2016 Summer Greenlight Celebration, an event for University of Advancing Technology (UAT) to acknowledge the amazing work of its UAT Game Studios students by offering them the opportunity to demonstrate the games they’ve been working on for the last semester to fellow students and to the public.

    The UAT Game Studios is a multidisciplinary collaboration of students across undergraduate and graduate degrees and on-ground and online programs consisting of mostly game design and game programming students, as well as art and animation majors to form well-rounded game development or game dev teams.

    What: 2016 Summer Greenlight Celebration
    Where: UAT Theater and Commons
    When: August 12, 2016, from 6-8 p.m.
    Why: To celebrate the amazing work of UAT Game Studios students and demo their games
    Who: UAT Game Studios students

    The event includes team awards and game demos.

    You can meet the game devs and artists behind the games and remember why you love to play games in the first place – to have fun!
    Join us in celebrating our teams’ hard work in turning ambitious game concepts into playable realities.

    Follow @UATGameStudios on Twitter and like UAT Game Studios on Facebook.

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    UnderEarth by CrackerJame Games, UAT Game Studios alumni

    UAT Students Playtest Alumni Game at VR Release Party

    (Jun. 14, 2016)

    CrackerJack Games LLC paid a visit to alma matter University of Advancing Technology to hold the first public demo of UnderEarth at an Alumni Video Game Release Party on May 19, 2016. UnderEarth is an immersive, first-person...

    CrackerJack Games LLC paid a visit to alma matter University of Advancing Technology to hold the first public demo of UnderEarth at an Alumni Video Game Release Party on May 19, 2016.

    UnderEarth is an immersive, first-person puzzle game available to play on both PC and Oculus Rift, slated to launch sales on Steam in June. The UnderEarth team flew in to Arizona from different states for the essential opportunity to gain real-time reactions and feedback from the active gaming community, what better place to find such a devoted pool of game enthusiasts, but at UAT!

    Game synopsis: Following Valvorta Corp’s declared emergency mission, the player must simultaneously manage life support systems and locate tools, documents, devices while navigating with magnetic boot attachments to assess what’s happened in the facility and how to repair and rescue.

    UnderEarth screenshot - O2 Garden

    UnderEarth screenshot – O2 Garden

    The UnderEarth team members include: Kerrigan Guthrie — Level Designer, Joseph Marin – Lead Programmer, John Waynick — Senior Artist, Joseph Wilhems — Lead Designer and Allison Summers – Artist.

    The game developers were available for questions and to offer helpful tips so that the eager playtesters could quickly grasp the game’s scope and enjoy the game they worked so hard to develop.

    Overall, the UnderEarth team heard positive reviews during the live demo commenting on the the brilliant imagery, stimulating environments and overall game challenges that UnderEarth presents to gamers.

    UnderEarth playtest at UAT

    UnderEarth playtest for PC and Oculus Rift, held at UAT

    Did we mention this game is also in VR? Yes! UAT game students jumped at the chance to playtest a new game on Oculus Rift. As it currently stands, UAT Game Studios and alumni have only produced a few games in Virtual Reality so it’s a rare find, but with games like Reflections, Wizards 1984 VR and now UnderEarth, our game devs stands to change that!

    Watch the latest demo of UnderEarth on Steam here.

    Keep up with UnderEarth’s progress on social media! Like CrackerJack Games on Facebook and Twitter.

    Thanks for coming out to play UnderEarth!

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    Oddity the Game

    Phoenix Comicon Panels: Project Oddity Team Lead Harlan Whitfield To Discuss Experimental Art & Game Design

    (Jun. 1, 2016)

    UAT students are ready for Phoenix Comicon starting tomorrow at the Phoenix Convention Center! The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined Phoenix Comicon last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak...

    UAT students are ready for Phoenix Comicon starting tomorrow at the Phoenix Convention Center!

    The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined Phoenix Comicon last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak about “Team Leads Perspective on Game Development.”

    Team Lead for Project: Oddity, Harlan Whitfield who graduated in Spring 2015 with a degree in Game Art and Animation has a great deal of knowledge in 2D Art and Animation. He plans to mainly discuss experimental art and game design during the Comicon Panel.

    Project Oddity Development Team working in UAT Game Studios

    Project Oddity Development Team working in UAT Game Studios

    Let’s learn more about where Harlan’s idea for Project: Oddity originated.

    According to Harlan, Oddity was originally a “Student Innovation Project” (SIP), which focused on innovation in our major field of study. I thought that art may be difficult to innovate, but I brainstormed some of my favorite games and elements that have existed for decades but were rarely expanded on. I focused on mechanics and storytelling elements and came up with the idea of “shadow saves,” expanding on ideas from some of my favorite games.

    Inspired by the Silent Hill games, Oddity plays off how these games would have multiple endings, many of which were only accessible through playing over a saved file and how Silent Hill 3 would react to saved files from Silent Hill 2 and cause a unique event to happen, changing the game. There are games that change slightly when you play the game and there are some that even break the fourth wall to talk about what you did in a previous save but these are rarely a major element in the game and often have little impact on the actual game play.

    Oddity explores the possibility of a game that saves context information, such as character feelings, memories and special events and using them to manipulate the game. While other games rely on completing a game to get new content, Oddity wants every action to have an impact on the same game. Actions taken earlier within the game can have a great impact on later events and should be thought out by the player. In most games that deal with choice, players can simply reload and keep changing their decisions to get the results they want, as characters in game don’t usually remember your actions. Oddity focuses on remembering these actions and using them to influence the game every time the player reloads to a save file, either by dying or manually reloading to a previous save. Oddity focuses on replay-ability, designing a game that changes the more you play it. There are existing games that react to previous gameplay or small unlocked details but they are minor changes. Oddity uses element as a core mechanic; allowing players to jump between load files in a single story arc to make subtle to drastic changes to in-game details.

    Take a look at the latest version of Project Oddity in the demo below.

    Currently the Project: Oddity development team consists of:

    • Harlan Whitfield – Product Owner, Art and Design Lead
    • Rachel Coniglio – programmer
    • Kayla Godard – artist
    • Axl Pacheco – artist
    • Steven Crane – design
    • John Weiner – design

    Each semester the team members working on Oddity change. We keep a list of current members and their roles on our website.

    Project: Oddity Team Lead to Speak on Phoenix Comicon Panel

    Project: Oddity Team Lead to Speak on Phoenix Comicon Panel

    The team originally pitched Greenlight in Fall 2015 and was just approved at Spring Greenlight to continue development this summer. Progress thus far: The development team for Project: Oddity has created the basic mechanics, detailed story elements (the game is an expansive, changing story) for the demo and is now polishing the demo for public play testing.

    Keep up-to-date with game demos on Project: Oddity’s website.

    ABOUT PHOENIX COMICON PANEL:

    As experienced game development team leads within UAT Game Studios, students will discuss the Greenlight process and how they came to lead each respective project. Students will also talk about the process of developing games within the production studio, as well as give insight to the day in the life of a game project lead.

    At UAT, game students work with a diverse group of disciplines, including the UAT Digital Video program, and have a unique perspective on the development process. As a group, each game lead has faced unique circumstances and can share numerous insights into the ways those challenges have influenced them as developers. Attend the panel on June 2, from 1-2 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center in room West 213A. For more information, click here.

     

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    Crimson Nights Game at UAT Game Studios

    Crimson Nights Team Lead Kenny Ryan to Speak About Teamwork on Phoenix Comicon Panel

    (Jun. 1, 2016)

    The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined Phoenix Comicon last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak about “Team Leads Perspective on Game Development.” Team Lead for Crimson Nights, Kenny...

    The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined Phoenix Comicon last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak about “Team Leads Perspective on Game Development.”

    Team Lead for Crimson Nights, Kenny Ryan who majors in Game Design has a great deal of knowledge in team collaboration and gameplay design. He plans to mainly discuss entering the game industry and working with others during the Comicon Panel.

    Let’s find out where Multiplayer Dungeon Crawler, Crimson Nights originated according to Team Lead and Lead Designer Kenny Ryan.

    Crimson Nights started as a concept involving 4 players, a fighting game between the boss and each other. The game was then created as a 48-hour game jam game, and won in three categories. Afterwards it was pitched at Greenlight and successfully became a game under development in the UAT Game Studios program.

    Crimson Nights Game Team Lead Kenny Ryan

    Crimson Nights Game Team Lead Kenny Ryan

    The idea was to take the original game jam project and evolve it the concept into a full game. There were a lot of things that we, as a team, learned along the way. Crimson Nights development team saw many benefits from being part of UAT Game Studios as they kept pushing us to do great things. The Greenlight process was also huge for us, as it really helped the team focus on its goals.

    The initial six members of the team are friends and created the game jam game. Following that an additional four team members joined, along with nine more developers who joined along the way.

    Crimson Nights Game Development Team

    Crimson Nights Game Development Team

    Each team member greatly helped to shape not only the game, but the entire team, as well.

    The Crimson Nights Team consists of:
    Kenny Ryan – Lead Designer
    Jersey Calderwood – Lead Programmer
    Terrence Miller – Lead Artist
    Zak Kaszubowski – Environment, Decals and Effects Artist
    Jake Turocy – Character Artist
    Kendal Cormany – Programming Management and Mechanics
    Alison Taylor – AI Programmer and Menu Programmer
    Noah Stumpf – Boss Programmer
    Audrey McEvoy – Effects and Enemy Artist
    Kasey Harris – Enemy, Icons and Advertisement Artist
    Connor Fardell – Bug Testing and Implementation Designer
    Killian Davies – Scrum Master and Character Artist
    Ethan Klees – Bug Testing and Adverting

    The team originally pitched Greenlight in summer of 2015 and worked in the UAT Game Studios for two semesters. Currently, our team is working on removing the major kinks hidden in the game before we add more content. We are aiming to release our first demo in September 2016.

    See our current game build in the YouTube video below.

    The team has created the midway base for all of the game modes along with all of the main art assets for the game. The project is about 60 percent complete, with programming as a majority of the work remaining. We also are looking further into marketing and social events.

    My knowledge of the gaming industry has changed a lot as of working on Crimson Nights as it builds the relationship of team work. There is a lot that working on a team creates, and the best part is you can see through so many other people eyes. With what we were creating we had open eyes and minds to what we saw and did. We wanted people to have a say on our team and we chose the best choices for the project. I think that this is definitely a very indie developers approach, and for us it worked out well.

    Crimson Nights created their own t-shirt design and sold them to raise money for their team. They also looked great when they all wore their shirts around campus. Way to think like an entrepreneur and look like a team while doing so!

    Crimson Nights Game - T-shirts

    Crimson Nights Game – T-shirts

    ABOUT PHOENIX COMICON PANEL:
    As experienced game development team leads within UAT Game Studios, students will discuss the Greenlight process and how they came to lead each respective project.

    Students will also talk about the process of developing games within the production studio, as well as give insight to the day in the life of a game project lead. At UAT, game students work with a diverse group of disciplines, including the UAT Digital Video program, and have a unique perspective on the development process. As a group, each game lead has faced unique circumstances and can share numerous insights into the ways those challenges have influenced them as developers.

    Attend the panel on June 2, from 1-2 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center in room West 213A. For more information, click here.

     

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    UAT Game Studios Team Lead Justin JT Trimmer

    Phoenix Comicon Panel: JT Trimmer To Speak About Developing Two Games Simultaneously

    (May. 31, 2016)

    With only days until the beginning of Phoenix Comicon, the excitement of UAT students is rising to a crescendo. Part of the enthusiasm is for a panel being presented by some of the UAT Game Studio project team leads. In this panel the leads will discuss “Team Leads Perspective on Game...

    With only days until the beginning of Phoenix Comicon, the excitement of UAT students is rising to a crescendo. Part of the enthusiasm is for a panel being presented by some of the UAT Game Studio project team leads. In this panel the leads will discuss “Team Leads Perspective on Game Development.”

    Team lead for The Cortez Family Justin “JT” Trimmer, also worked on the project The Deadliest War. JT, who majors in game programming, has a great deal of knowledge in Unity development, game scripting with C#, and creative writing. He plans to mainly to discuss what is was like to contribute meaningfully to two projects simultaneously during the Comicon Panel.

    The Cortez Family Development Team - Professor Hue Henry and JT Trimmer

    The Cortez Family Development Team – Professor Hue Henry and JT Trimmer

    The Cortez Family was first pitched for Greenlight by Professor Matthew Henry. JT volunteered to work with him as a programmer and scrum master. After three weeks, project leadership was transferred completely to JT, so that Professor Henry could be available to provide mentorship to more students in the UAT Game Studios. In addition to JT the team also included two artists who were taking the UAT Game Studios class online.

    The Cortez Family Team Members
    JT Trimmer – Lead Programmer/Team Lead
    Professor Matthew Henry – Concept Creator/Mentor
    Charles Loy – Artist
    Paul Johnston – Artist
    The team originally pitched Fall Greenlight in December 2015. In the following 15 class weeks, the game matured from an initial concept to a near release state.

    ABOUT PHOENIX COMICON PANEL:
    As experienced game development team leads within UAT Game Studios, students will discuss the Greenlight process and how they came to lead each respective project.

    Students will also talk about the process of developing games within the production studio, as well as give insight to the day in the life of a game project lead. At UAT, game students work with a diverse group of disciplines, including the UAT Digital Video program, and have a unique perspective on the development process. As a group, each game lead has faced unique circumstances and can share numerous insights into the ways those challenges have influenced them as developers.

    Attend the panel on June 2, from 1-2 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center in room West 213A. For more information, click here.

     

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    Mirrored Game Team Lead to Speak at Phoenix Comicon with UAT Game Studios

    Live in the Game LLCs Ben Pope to Speak on Comicon Panel with UAT Game Studios Team Leads

    (May. 31, 2016)

    Who’s ready for Phoenix Comicon? Just two more days until the fun begins at Phoenix Convention Center. The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined the Con last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak...

    Who’s ready for Phoenix Comicon? Just two more days until the fun begins at Phoenix Convention Center.

    The Arizona Video Games Showcase joined the Con last year giving UAT indie game companies a chance to showcase their completed games to the public. This year, UAT Game Studios Team Leads stepped it up by pitching Phoenix Comicon as panelists; for which they were selected to speak about “Team Leads Perspective on Game Development.”

    Team Lead for Mirrored: The Reflective Resolution, Benjamin Pope who studied Game Design and Game Art & Animation has a great deal of knowledge in Game Design/Production, Psychology and leading teams. Ben is qualified to give his perspective on game development because he created his own game company called Live in the Game, LLC in 2015. He has also worked on and manages other projects from the studio: Mirrored: Pop-Up Play Mobile, Model Weapons Expert, Wry Reveries, Puppet Master and an educational, history app called Map of Games, as part of the studio’s mission to give back to the gaming community. Ben has also hosted multiple Game Jams to encourage game developers to fill their portfolios with completed works.

    Let’s learn more about where Ben’s idea for Mirrored: The Reflective Resolution originated.

    Per Ben: I got the idea for Mirrored from my work in psychology and counseling, where I dealt with children, teenagers and adults who went through traumatic events. I wanted to weave psychological meanings into my games to give them depth and to merge my psychology background with game design. Additionally, I love the concept of Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll and I designed Mirrored to have an influence on the protagonist and is also mirrored a bit with the main character’s cat companion.

    See the latest demo of Mirrored: The Reflective Resolution in the video below.

    The development process for Mirrored began before joining Greenlight, which is what we felt was best for the game. We had been in production for a year before merging it into the structure of UAT Game Studios development. It was challenging at first but much was learned in doing so to bring the game to a more professional level of industry development. A significant benefit in addition to joining UAT Game Studios was the ability to work with a lot more students, attracting both on campus and online talent coming together to work on the development process and learning from each other how to better run the team. Working in the studio and having more dedicated development time, we were able to better hold each member accountable of their tasks, helping to mimic real-world industry settings.

    Mirrored has come along way in its life cycle thanks to the efforts of all team members involved. See the progress the Mirrored team has made here: link to game builds or website

    The team originally pitched Greenlight in May 2015.

    How did you find team members? I found some members of the team for this and other games through working in classes alongside students who found the projects interesting and then inviting them to work with our team and in the studio. Many core and permanent members were found through this means. Game job fairs were used to go through many rounds of recruits over the years to find developers who would remain and work on the games.

    Mirrored Game Team Lead to Speak at Phoenix Comicon

    Mirrored Game Team Lead to Speak at Phoenix Comicon

    The Greenlight process enabled a lot more exposure for each game. UAT Game Studios inspired many students to return to the game to build up their work experience. Thanks to UAT and the never ending work of Mirrored’s original members to mentor and lead new team members.

    Who are your team members?

    The Mirrored: The Reflective Resolution team has consisted of many team members over the years, all of which are greatly appreciated for their work.

    Mirrored Game Development Team at UAT

    Mirrored Game Development Team at UAT – Desiree Nienhaus and Kathy Norris

    The team members currently contributing are:

    Ben Pope – Creative Director/Lead Design/CEO
    Desiree Nienhaus – Assistant Mgr/General Artist
    Kathy Norris – Assistant Mgr/General Artist/Videographer
    James Amparan – Lead Level Artist
    Kasey Harris – Lead Animator/Character Artist
    Chris Helm – Lead Programmer
    Shawn Meek – SCRUM Master/Programmer
    Dave Engleman – Programmer
    Lydia Roa-Netherton – Social Media/Community Manager/Marketing
    Sarah Eberhardt – 2D Storyboard Artist
    Nicole Eberhardt – 2D Storyboard Artist
    Jonathan Weiner – Level Designer/2D Artist
    Brandon Gardner – Lead 3D Artist/Animator/Textures
    Lucas Ciarlante – Lead Sound Designer/Musician
    Rebecca Pope – Marketing
    James Simpson – Programmer

    The studio wishes to thank all the contributors over the production cycle who have put forth a lot of good work in the project in many varied capacities.

    About Mirrored: The Reflective Resolution:
    Follow this 2.5D thriller and puzzler that follows the story of a girl named Lily and her mysterious cat companion Logos through several levels that involve dealing with the loss of her parents and fitting in with her new life situation toward the goal of resolution. This requires entry into a mirrored/alternate reality to battle shadow bosses with a defensive mechanic used to survive the battles.

    Lily and Logos of Mirrored Game

    Lily and Logos of Mirrored Game

    ABOUT PHOENIX COMICON PANEL:
    As experienced game development team leads within UAT Game Studios, students will discuss the Greenlight process and how they came to lead each respective project.

    Students will also talk about the process of developing games within the production studio, as well as give insight to the day in the life of a game project lead. At UAT, game students work with a diverse group of disciplines, including the UAT Digital Video program, and have a unique perspective on the development process. As a group, each game lead has faced unique circumstances and can share numerous insights into the ways those challenges have influenced them as developers.

    Attend the panel on June 2, from 1-2 p.m., at the Phoenix Convention Center in room West 213A. For more information, click here.

    Connect with Live in the Game, LLC studio on Facebook and Twitter at @liveinthegame2. Support the Mirrored Game with new Mirrored t-shirts and posters on their merchandise page, available here.

     

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